anyone got an electric aga?

Discussion in 'Misc DIY' started by vbleau, Jan 19, 2009.

  1. vbleau

    vbleau Guest

    I moved house and left behind my 4 oven oil fired aga.

    The oven in my new house is awful by comparrison so I am considering
    another aga.

    Does anyone have experience of a new electric aga - the ordinary 13
    amp one, not the night storage one?
    I have heard mixed reports on their reliability.
    Thanks
     
    vbleau, Jan 19, 2009
    #1
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  2. vbleau wrote:
    > I moved house and left behind my 4 oven oil fired aga.
    >
    > The oven in my new house is awful by comparrison so I am considering
    > another aga.
    >
    > Does anyone have experience of a new electric aga - the ordinary 13
    > amp one, not the night storage one?
    > I have heard mixed reports on their reliability.
    > Thanks



    Dunno what could go WRONG frankly.

    The average fuel aga runs at about 600W-1kw 24x7., If that's OK on your
    bills, it should be fine..


    13A sounds about right..probably toggles a 3KW element on and off.
     
    The Natural Philosopher, Jan 19, 2009
    #2
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  3. vbleau

    Bruce Guest

    Peter Parry <> wrote:
    >On Mon, 19 Jan 2009 15:29:55 +0000, The Natural Philosopher <>
    >wrote:
    >
    >>vbleau wrote:

    >
    >>> Does anyone have experience of a new electric aga - the ordinary 13
    >>> amp one, not the night storage one?
    >>> I have heard mixed reports on their reliability.

    >
    >[snip]
    >
    >>The average fuel aga runs at about 600W-1kw 24x7., If that's OK on your
    >>bills, it should be fine..

    >
    >The 4 oven electric Aga averages 1,600W/hr continuously (270kW a
    >week) according to Aga. By buying a £300 add on timer (Aga
    >Intelligent Management System) this can be reduced to about 1,300W/hr
    >or a mere 11.4 MWh per year at a cost of about £1,100.



    Apart from the cost, I wonder how much carbon dioxide is emitted?
     
    Bruce, Jan 20, 2009
    #3
  4. vbleau

    Bob Eager Guest

    On Tue, 20 Jan 2009 14:25:12 UTC, Bruce <> wrote:

    > Peter Parry <> wrote:
    > >On Mon, 19 Jan 2009 15:29:55 +0000, The Natural Philosopher <>
    > >wrote:
    > >
    > >>vbleau wrote:

    > >
    > >>> Does anyone have experience of a new electric aga - the ordinary 13
    > >>> amp one, not the night storage one?
    > >>> I have heard mixed reports on their reliability.

    > >
    > >[snip]
    > >
    > >>The average fuel aga runs at about 600W-1kw 24x7., If that's OK on your
    > >>bills, it should be fine..

    > >
    > >The 4 oven electric Aga averages 1,600W/hr continuously (270kW a
    > >week) according to Aga. By buying a £300 add on timer (Aga
    > >Intelligent Management System) this can be reduced to about 1,300W/hr
    > >or a mere 11.4 MWh per year at a cost of about £1,100.

    >
    > Apart from the cost, I wonder how much carbon dioxide is emitted?


    None at all by the Aga! :)

    And possibly none at all at all, if it's powered from nukular...

    --
    The information contained in this post is copyright the
    poster, and specifically may not be published in, or used by
    http://www.diybanter.com
     
    Bob Eager, Jan 20, 2009
    #4
  5. vbleau

    Bruce Guest

    "Bob Eager" <> wrote:
    >On Tue, 20 Jan 2009 14:25:12 UTC, Bruce <> wrote:
    >
    >> Peter Parry <> wrote:
    >> >On Mon, 19 Jan 2009 15:29:55 +0000, The Natural Philosopher <>
    >> >wrote:
    >> >
    >> >>vbleau wrote:
    >> >
    >> >>> Does anyone have experience of a new electric aga - the ordinary 13
    >> >>> amp one, not the night storage one?
    >> >>> I have heard mixed reports on their reliability.
    >> >
    >> >[snip]
    >> >
    >> >>The average fuel aga runs at about 600W-1kw 24x7., If that's OK on your
    >> >>bills, it should be fine..
    >> >
    >> >The 4 oven electric Aga averages 1,600W/hr continuously (270kW a
    >> >week) according to Aga. By buying a £300 add on timer (Aga
    >> >Intelligent Management System) this can be reduced to about 1,300W/hr
    >> >or a mere 11.4 MWh per year at a cost of about £1,100.

    >>
    >> Apart from the cost, I wonder how much carbon dioxide is emitted?

    >
    >None at all by the Aga! :)
    >
    >And possibly none at all at all, if it's powered from nukular...



    It seems a bit excessive to have a new nuclear power station built
    specially to power an Aga. I knew they were incredibly inefficient and
    environmentally unfriendly, but are they really that bad? ;-)

    In the meantime, the Aga will have to draw its power from the National
    Grid. Approximately 80% of the power from the Grid is generated by
    fossil fuels (gas and coal) so I repeat, I wonder how much carbon
    dioxide is emitted?


    [I suppose you are one of those people who think that using an electric
    car emits zero carbon!]
     
    Bruce, Jan 20, 2009
    #5
  6. On 20 Jan 2009 14:55:22 GMT, Bob Eager wrote:

    >> Apart from the cost, I wonder how much carbon dioxide is emitted?

    >
    > None at all by the Aga! :)
    >
    > And possibly none at all at all, if it's powered from nukular...


    Or hydro but both are not including the CO2 emmited during construction of
    said power plants...

    --
    Cheers
    Dave.
     
    Dave Liquorice, Jan 20, 2009
    #6
  7. Bruce wrote:
    > "Bob Eager" <> wrote:
    >> On Tue, 20 Jan 2009 14:25:12 UTC, Bruce <> wrote:
    >>
    >>> Peter Parry <> wrote:
    >>>> On Mon, 19 Jan 2009 15:29:55 +0000, The Natural Philosopher <>
    >>>> wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> vbleau wrote:
    >>>>>> Does anyone have experience of a new electric aga - the ordinary 13
    >>>>>> amp one, not the night storage one?
    >>>>>> I have heard mixed reports on their reliability.
    >>>> [snip]
    >>>>
    >>>>> The average fuel aga runs at about 600W-1kw 24x7., If that's OK on your
    >>>>> bills, it should be fine..
    >>>> The 4 oven electric Aga averages 1,600W/hr continuously (270kW a
    >>>> week) according to Aga. By buying a £300 add on timer (Aga
    >>>> Intelligent Management System) this can be reduced to about 1,300W/hr
    >>>> or a mere 11.4 MWh per year at a cost of about £1,100.
    >>> Apart from the cost, I wonder how much carbon dioxide is emitted?

    >> None at all by the Aga! :)
    >>
    >> And possibly none at all at all, if it's powered from nukular...

    >
    >
    > It seems a bit excessive to have a new nuclear power station built
    > specially to power an Aga. I knew they were incredibly inefficient and
    > environmentally unfriendly, but are they really that bad? ;-)
    >
    > In the meantime, the Aga will have to draw its power from the National
    > Grid. Approximately 80% of the power from the Grid is generated by
    > fossil fuels (gas and coal) so I repeat, I wonder how much carbon
    > dioxide is emitted?
    >


    Well; e can look forward to the first pebble bed reactor aga probably.

    "Top up with any old radioactive shit once a year, heat your house and
    generate your electricity, too.
    "
    :)
     
    The Natural Philosopher, Jan 20, 2009
    #7
  8. David Hansen wrote:
    > On 20 Jan 2009 14:55:22 GMT someone who may be "Bob Eager"
    > <> wrote this:-
    >
    >> And possibly none at all at all, if it's powered from nukular...

    >
    > Nuclear electricity generation emits carbon dioxide, despite claims
    > to the contrary by the likes of Bernard Ingham. The debate is how
    > much it emits.
    >
    > Even if the power station itself emits almost no carbon dioxide,
    > none of them has a hole in the ground nearby from which fuel rods
    > can be taken. Rather a lot of stuff has to be mined and separated,
    > be transported long distances [1] and go through several energy
    > intensive processes before it is turned into a fuel rod.
    >


    Yup. Most of which could use nuclear power to power them.

    > If it is to be "reprocessed" then a fuel rod then goes through a
    > number of energy intensive processes, including producing highly
    > radioactive nitric acid which must be kept cool using energy
    > intensive mechanical means in tanks [2] for a long time if it is not
    > to boil and the tanks possibly explode [3] before it goes through an
    > energy intensive process to turn it into glass blocks.
    >


    Yup. All 50 tons a year of them.

    Compaed with the HUGELY energy intensive job of setting up and
    maintaining the 500,000 tons of windmills they replace?


    >
    > [1] no uranium mines in the UK, Australia and Canada are the largest
    > suppliers and are some way away.
    >
    > [2] An article in the New Scientist in September 2001 estimated that
    > an attack on these tanks would release 44 times as much
    > radioactivity as the 1986 Chernobyl disaster, and would ultimately
    > cause 1.2 million cancers in Britain and Ireland.
    >


    New scientist..well what DO you expect.

    > [3] one of the Tomsk-7 explosions illustrated what happens if this
    > liquid is in an explosion. Fortunately Tomsk-7 is in a remote area.
    >

    Oh dear oh dear. Usual proof by assertion bollocks.
    >
    >
     
    The Natural Philosopher, Jan 20, 2009
    #8
  9. vbleau

    RobertL Guest

    On Jan 20, 2:18 pm, Peter Parry <> wrote:
    > On Mon, 19 Jan 2009 15:29:55 +0000, The Natural Philosopher <>
    > wrote:
    >
    > >vbleau wrote:
    > >> Does anyone have   experience of a new electric aga - the ordinary 13
    > >> amp one, not the night storage one?
    > >> I have heard mixed reports on their reliability.

    >
    > [snip]
    >
    > >The average fuel aga runs at about 600W-1kw 24x7., If that's OK on your
    > >bills, it should be fine..

    >
    > The 4 oven electric Aga averages 1,600W/hr continuously  (270kW a
    > week) according to Aga.  By buying a £300 add on timer (Aga
    > Intelligent Management System) this can be reduced to about 1,300W/hr
    > or a mere 11.4 MWh per year at a cost of about £1,100.




    To be fair, that heat does heat the house so in winter at least there
    is some offset.


    Robert
     
    RobertL, Jan 20, 2009
    #9
  10. vbleau

    Bruce Guest

    The Natural Philosopher <> wrote:
    >Bruce wrote:
    >>
    >> It seems a bit excessive to have a new nuclear power station built
    >> specially to power an Aga. I knew they were incredibly inefficient and
    >> environmentally unfriendly, but are they really that bad? ;-)
    >>
    >> In the meantime, the Aga will have to draw its power from the National
    >> Grid. Approximately 80% of the power from the Grid is generated by
    >> fossil fuels (gas and coal) so I repeat, I wonder how much carbon
    >> dioxide is emitted?
    >>

    >
    >Well; e can look forward to the first pebble bed reactor aga probably.
    >
    >"Top up with any old radioactive shit once a year, heat your house and
    >generate your electricity, too.
    >"
    >:)



    Added bonus: you and your kids will glow in the dark. ;-)
     
    Bruce, Jan 20, 2009
    #10
  11. vbleau

    Andy Dingley Guest

    On 20 Jan, 16:22, RobertL <> wrote:

    > To be fair, that heat does heat the house  so in winter at least there
    > is some offset.


    Heating my kitchen (Victorian, rear extension, poor insulation)
    wouldn't usefully heat my house.
     
    Andy Dingley, Jan 20, 2009
    #11
  12. In article <>,
    Bruce <> writes:
    >
    > It seems a bit excessive to have a new nuclear power station built
    > specially to power an Aga. I knew they were incredibly inefficient and
    > environmentally unfriendly, but are they really that bad? ;-)
    >
    > In the meantime, the Aga will have to draw its power from the National
    > Grid. Approximately 80% of the power from the Grid is generated by
    > fossil fuels (gas and coal) so I repeat, I wonder how much carbon
    > dioxide is emitted?


    So you want an aga that takes uranium rods directly.
    Mind you, as the dinner turns into carbon, it might
    run away and go uncontrolled critical ;-)

    --
    Andrew Gabriel
    [email address is not usable -- followup in the newsgroup]
     
    Andrew Gabriel, Jan 20, 2009
    #12
  13. vbleau

    Bruce Guest

    (Andrew Gabriel) wrote:
    >
    >So you want an aga that takes uranium rods directly.
    >Mind you, as the dinner turns into carbon, it might
    >run away and go uncontrolled critical ;-)



    Ah yes, that would be the "Sellafield" brand of cooker.

    ;-)
     
    Bruce, Jan 20, 2009
    #13
  14. vbleau

    Rod Guest

    Bruce wrote:
    > (Andrew Gabriel) wrote:
    >> So you want an aga that takes uranium rods directly.
    >> Mind you, as the dinner turns into carbon, it might
    >> run away and go uncontrolled critical ;-)

    >
    >
    > Ah yes, that would be the "Sellafield" brand of cooker.
    >
    > ;-)


    And the huge advantage of stopping much food poisoning in its tracks!
    (Assuming it works like the Cobalt irradiation units, and that they
    work. Obviously won't help with toxins already produced by the bacteria...)

    --
    Rod

    Hypothyroidism is a seriously debilitating condition with an insidious
    onset.
    Although common it frequently goes undiagnosed.
    <www.thyromind.info> <www.thyroiduk.org> <www.altsupportthyroid.org>
     
    Rod, Jan 20, 2009
    #14
  15. vbleau

    Rod Guest

    RobertL wrote:
    > On Jan 20, 2:18 pm, Peter Parry <> wrote:
    >> On Mon, 19 Jan 2009 15:29:55 +0000, The Natural Philosopher <>
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>> vbleau wrote:
    >>>> Does anyone have experience of a new electric aga - the ordinary 13
    >>>> amp one, not the night storage one?
    >>>> I have heard mixed reports on their reliability.

    >> [snip]
    >>
    >>> The average fuel aga runs at about 600W-1kw 24x7., If that's OK on your
    >>> bills, it should be fine..

    >> The 4 oven electric Aga averages 1,600W/hr continuously (270kW a
    >> week) according to Aga. By buying a £300 add on timer (Aga
    >> Intelligent Management System) this can be reduced to about 1,300W/hr
    >> or a mere 11.4 MWh per year at a cost of about £1,100.

    >
    >
    >
    > To be fair, that heat does heat the house so in winter at least there
    > is some offset.
    >
    >
    > Robert
    >


    And in summer there is the 'negative offset' of running a/c to keep cool
    in the kitchen?

    --
    Rod

    Hypothyroidism is a seriously debilitating condition with an insidious
    onset.
    Although common it frequently goes undiagnosed.
    <www.thyromind.info> <www.thyroiduk.org> <www.altsupportthyroid.org>
     
    Rod, Jan 20, 2009
    #15
  16. vbleau

    ARWadsworth Guest

    "John Rumm" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > The Natural Philosopher wrote:
    > > David Hansen wrote:
    > >> On 20 Jan 2009 14:55:22 GMT someone who may be "Bob Eager"
    > >> <> wrote this:-
    > >>
    > >>> And possibly none at all at all, if it's powered from nukular...
    > >>
    > >> Nuclear electricity generation emits carbon dioxide, despite claims
    > >> to the contrary by the likes of Bernard Ingham. The debate is how
    > >> much it emits.
    > >>
    > >> Even if the power station itself emits almost no carbon dioxide,
    > >> none of them has a hole in the ground nearby from which fuel rods
    > >> can be taken. Rather a lot of stuff has to be mined and separated,
    > >> be transported long distances [1] and go through several energy
    > >> intensive processes before it is turned into a fuel rod.
    > >>

    > >
    > > Yup. Most of which could use nuclear power to power them.

    >
    > Also worth noting that the quantity of mined uranium required to run a
    > reactor for a year is probably comparable to what a standard fossil fuel
    > power station will get through in a matter of days or even hours.


    Where is our coal shipped from these days? China, South America?

    Adam
     
    ARWadsworth, Jan 20, 2009
    #16
  17. John Rumm wrote:
    > The Natural Philosopher wrote:
    >> David Hansen wrote:
    >>> On 20 Jan 2009 14:55:22 GMT someone who may be "Bob Eager"
    >>> <> wrote this:-
    >>>
    >>>> And possibly none at all at all, if it's powered from nukular...
    >>>
    >>> Nuclear electricity generation emits carbon dioxide, despite claims
    >>> to the contrary by the likes of Bernard Ingham. The debate is how
    >>> much it emits.
    >>>
    >>> Even if the power station itself emits almost no carbon dioxide,
    >>> none of them has a hole in the ground nearby from which fuel rods
    >>> can be taken. Rather a lot of stuff has to be mined and separated,
    >>> be transported long distances [1] and go through several energy
    >>> intensive processes before it is turned into a fuel rod.
    >>>

    >>
    >> Yup. Most of which could use nuclear power to power them.

    >
    > Also worth noting that the quantity of mined uranium required to run a
    > reactor for a year is probably comparable to what a standard fossil fuel
    > power station will get through in a matter of days or even hours.
    >
    >

    The actual tonnage of refined is aroudn 50 tins a year I think.

    The raw ore is around 100 times more so 5k tonnes of e.g. yellowcake.

    Complicated by fast breeders and recycling of spent rods. Both of which
    reduce fuel consumption.
     
    The Natural Philosopher, Jan 20, 2009
    #17
  18. ARWadsworth wrote:
    > "John Rumm" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> The Natural Philosopher wrote:
    >>> David Hansen wrote:
    >>>> On 20 Jan 2009 14:55:22 GMT someone who may be "Bob Eager"
    >>>> <> wrote this:-
    >>>>
    >>>>> And possibly none at all at all, if it's powered from nukular...
    >>>> Nuclear electricity generation emits carbon dioxide, despite claims
    >>>> to the contrary by the likes of Bernard Ingham. The debate is how
    >>>> much it emits.
    >>>>
    >>>> Even if the power station itself emits almost no carbon dioxide,
    >>>> none of them has a hole in the ground nearby from which fuel rods
    >>>> can be taken. Rather a lot of stuff has to be mined and separated,
    >>>> be transported long distances [1] and go through several energy
    >>>> intensive processes before it is turned into a fuel rod.
    >>>>
    >>> Yup. Most of which could use nuclear power to power them.

    >> Also worth noting that the quantity of mined uranium required to run a
    >> reactor for a year is probably comparable to what a standard fossil fuel
    >> power station will get through in a matter of days or even hours.

    >
    > Where is our coal shipped from these days? China, South America?
    >

    belgium, poland..

    > Adam
    >
    >
     
    The Natural Philosopher, Jan 20, 2009
    #18
  19. vbleau

    Bruce Guest

    Rod <> wrote:
    >Bruce wrote:
    >> (Andrew Gabriel) wrote:
    >>> So you want an aga that takes uranium rods directly.
    >>> Mind you, as the dinner turns into carbon, it might
    >>> run away and go uncontrolled critical ;-)

    >>
    >>
    >> Ah yes, that would be the "Sellafield" brand of cooker.
    >>
    >> ;-)

    >
    >And the huge advantage of stopping much food poisoning in its tracks!
    >(Assuming it works like the Cobalt irradiation units, and that they
    >work. Obviously won't help with toxins already produced by the bacteria...)



    I think the food poisoning might be the least of your worries. Far more
    worrying is the prospect of the nuclear core melting down and taking up
    residence in the basement ...
     
    Bruce, Jan 20, 2009
    #19
  20. vbleau

    Rod Guest

    Bruce wrote:
    > Rod <> wrote:
    >> Bruce wrote:
    >>> (Andrew Gabriel) wrote:
    >>>> So you want an aga that takes uranium rods directly.
    >>>> Mind you, as the dinner turns into carbon, it might
    >>>> run away and go uncontrolled critical ;-)
    >>>
    >>> Ah yes, that would be the "Sellafield" brand of cooker.
    >>>
    >>> ;-)

    >> And the huge advantage of stopping much food poisoning in its tracks!
    >> (Assuming it works like the Cobalt irradiation units, and that they
    >> work. Obviously won't help with toxins already produced by the bacteria...)

    >
    >
    > I think the food poisoning might be the least of your worries. Far more
    > worrying is the prospect of the nuclear core melting down and taking up
    > residence in the basement ...
    >
    >

    Ready for the ground source heat pump... :)

    --
    Rod

    Hypothyroidism is a seriously debilitating condition with an insidious
    onset.
    Although common it frequently goes undiagnosed.
    <www.thyromind.info> <www.thyroiduk.org> <www.altsupportthyroid.org>
     
    Rod, Jan 20, 2009
    #20
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