Another CORGI gas question: bayonet connections

Discussion in 'UK DIY' started by rrh, May 30, 2004.

  1. rrh

    rrh Guest

    Sorry, this is probably an old chestnut, but googling the group doesn't give
    me the answer.

    Once a CORGI person has connected up a gas cooker with the usual flexible
    hose into bayonet fitting, is it sensible for the average DIYer to
    occasionally disconnect it in order to move the cooker out - eg to fit new
    flooring - then push it back in and connect it up again? I know it's not
    illegal to do it for oneself but that's not my point; I don't feel competent
    to do any gas work whatsoever myself and don't want to do even this simple
    thing if there is a safety risk I might not be able to spot or fix.

    On the other hand if this apparent no-brainer really is OK then I don't want
    to waste a hundred nicker (going rate here in sunny Norf London) on getting
    a CORGI bod in for a five minute job.
     
    rrh, May 30, 2004
    #1
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  2. rrh

    Ed Sirett Guest

    On Sun, 30 May 2004 19:13:19 +0100, rrh wrote:

    > Sorry, this is probably an old chestnut, but googling the group doesn't give
    > me the answer.
    >
    > Once a CORGI person has connected up a gas cooker with the usual flexible
    > hose into bayonet fitting, is it sensible for the average DIYer to
    > occasionally disconnect it in order to move the cooker out - eg to fit new
    > flooring - then push it back in and connect it up again? I know it's not
    > illegal to do it for oneself but that's not my point; I don't feel competent
    > to do any gas work whatsoever myself and don't want to do even this simple
    > thing if there is a safety risk I might not be able to spot or fix.
    >
    > On the other hand if this apparent no-brainer really is OK then I don't want
    > to waste a hundred nicker (going rate here in sunny Norf London) on getting
    > a CORGI bod in for a five minute job.


    I beleive the intention of the bayonet connector it provide a means of
    disconnecting the supply for the user to remove the cooker temporarily for
    cleaning etc.

    The analogy with electricity is the difference between _using_ a
    plug/socket and installing a socket.

    I have been called in occasionally to disconnect cookers where the
    connector has become very stiff through disuse. Generally IME the bayonet
    connectors are quite reliable although I did find one that leaked a
    little. Evenso if the cooker is being 'permanently' disconnected then
    replacing the bayonet outlet with a plugged pipe is better.

    --
    Ed Sirett - Property maintainer and registered gas fitter.
    The FAQ for uk.diy is at www.diyfaq.org.uk
    Gas fitting FAQ http://www.makewrite.demon.co.uk/GasFitting.html
    Sealed CH FAQ http://www.makewrite.demon.co.uk/SealedCH.html
     
    Ed Sirett, May 31, 2004
    #2
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