Adding 2nd Storey to Bungalow - Cost?

Discussion in 'UK DIY' started by Steve Buckley, May 7, 2004.

  1. Hi All,

    It's a tough question I know but what would be a ballpark figure to
    add a second storey to the following

    1950's bungalow
    currently has a slate pitched roof
    40'wide by 27' deep
    Located in Bolton, (North west)

    I'm just looking for a ballpark figure, i.e. 20k? 50k? 100k? 150k?!

    Depending on this cost we may/maynot buy the house. There may be other
    option such as adding a dorma but a 2nd storey would be the way to go,
    it sit in a row of large houses so planning SHOULD be ok (!)

    Cheers
    Steve
     
    Steve Buckley, May 7, 2004
    #1
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  2. Steve Buckley

    m mouser Guest

    "Steve Buckley" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hi All,
    >
    > It's a tough question I know but what would be a ballpark figure to
    > add a second storey to the following
    >
    > 1950's bungalow
    > currently has a slate pitched roof
    > 40'wide by 27' deep
    > Located in Bolton, (North west)
    >
    > I'm just looking for a ballpark figure, i.e. 20k? 50k? 100k? 150k?!
    >
    > Depending on this cost we may/maynot buy the house. There may be other
    > option such as adding a dorma but a 2nd storey would be the way to go,
    > it sit in a row of large houses so planning SHOULD be ok (!)


    And will this tower above your prospective new neighbours and be a blot
    on the landscape - like my neighbour is about to do? And I suppose you will
    tell the neighbours its a single room to house granny or something to get
    their sympathy will you?

    What is it with you people? If you want a bloody house then buy one ....
    OK OK I know, its cheaper to buy a bungalow and make dosh putting an
    extension on it, spoil everone elses location and then move on making a
    killing on the housing market.

    Whatever happened to buying a HOME not a money making venture?

    < a bit p*ssed off neighbour>
     
    m mouser, May 7, 2004
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. "Steve Buckley" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > It's a tough question I know but what would be a ballpark figure to
    > add a second storey to the following
    >
    > 1950's bungalow


    I've seen two similar bungalows in Trafford knocked down
    and rebuilt as houses, so I guess the cost as pretty similar
     
    Nick Finnigan, May 7, 2004
    #3
  4. Steve Buckley

    Steve Guest

    "m mouser" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > "Steve Buckley" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > Hi All,
    > >
    > > It's a tough question I know but what would be a ballpark figure to
    > > add a second storey to the following
    > >
    > > 1950's bungalow
    > > currently has a slate pitched roof
    > > 40'wide by 27' deep
    > > Located in Bolton, (North west)
    > >
    > > I'm just looking for a ballpark figure, i.e. 20k? 50k? 100k? 150k?!
    > >
    > > Depending on this cost we may/maynot buy the house. There may be other
    > > option such as adding a dorma but a 2nd storey would be the way to go,
    > > it sit in a row of large houses so planning SHOULD be ok (!)

    >
    > And will this tower above your prospective new neighbours and be a blot
    > on the landscape - like my neighbour is about to do? And I suppose you

    will
    > tell the neighbours its a single room to house granny or something to get
    > their sympathy will you?
    >
    > What is it with you people? If you want a bloody house then buy one ....
    > OK OK I know, its cheaper to buy a bungalow and make dosh putting an
    > extension on it, spoil everone elses location and then move on making a
    > killing on the housing market.
    >
    > Whatever happened to buying a HOME not a money making venture?
    >
    > < a bit p*ssed off neighbour>


    I think you need to speak to your neighbour NOT have a go at me without
    knowing the circumstances. As it happens the bungalow is the only single
    storey residence in a street of very large 2/3 storey houses and IT'S the
    blot on the landscape.
     
    Steve, May 7, 2004
    #4
  5. Steve Buckley

    Steve Guest

    "Nick Finnigan" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > "Steve Buckley" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > >
    > > It's a tough question I know but what would be a ballpark figure to
    > > add a second storey to the following
    > >
    > > 1950's bungalow

    >
    > I've seen two similar bungalows in Trafford knocked down
    > and rebuilt as houses, so I guess the cost as pretty similar


    Yeah I was wondering if demolition/rebuild would be cheaper. It seems a
    shame though as the original accrington brick house is quite pretty, though
    very small.
    I could do with a professional to take a look at it before we proceed with
    any offers. This will probably cost an arm and a leg though (OK, not much
    compared to buying a house that we can't extend)

    Cheers
    Steve
     
    Steve, May 7, 2004
    #5
  6. Steve Buckley

    nightjar Guest

    "Steve Buckley" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hi All,
    >
    > It's a tough question I know but what would be a ballpark figure to
    > add a second storey to the following
    >
    > 1950's bungalow
    > currently has a slate pitched roof
    > 40'wide by 27' deep
    > Located in Bolton, (North west)


    My guess would be that the foundations are probably not up to modern
    requirements for a second story. My house had a single storey extension
    added about 25 years ago, with foundations designed to take a second storey,
    if required. When I extended my detached garage a few years ago, the
    foundations required for that were twice as deep as I have on the house
    extension.

    Colin Bignell
     
    nightjar, May 8, 2004
    #6
  7. "Steve Buckley" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hi All,
    >
    > It's a tough question I know but what would be a ballpark figure to
    > add a second storey to the following
    >
    > 1950's bungalow
    > currently has a slate pitched roof
    > 40'wide by 27' deep
    > Located in Bolton, (North west)
    >
    > I'm just looking for a ballpark figure, i.e. 20k? 50k? 100k? 150k?!
    >
    > Depending on this cost we may/maynot buy the house. There may be other
    > option such as adding a dorma but a 2nd storey would be the way to go,
    > it sit in a row of large houses so planning SHOULD be ok (!)


    (1) Go talk to a local builder - they are more likely to know what building
    costs are in your area. They may also have some idea of how solid the
    foundations are in that age of house, though you should have a surveyor dig
    a trial pit alongside the foundations if you are really serious. This is,
    after all, what the BCO will require before granting planning permission.

    (2) A friend built his bungalow up to 2 storeys, and did a very nice job of
    it too. He suspended the second storey on a framework of I-beams so it
    placed no load on the existing walls - apparently better than trying to
    upgrade the foundations (presumably you would have to go all round the house
    digging out the existing fundations and underpinning before you could build
    upwards). Looking at the house you would never guess it started life as a
    bungalow.

    HTH
    Dave R
     
    David W.E. Roberts, May 8, 2004
    #7
  8. Steve Buckley

    Hugo Nebula Guest

    On Sat, 8 May 2004 13:57:26 +0100, a particular chimpanzee named
    "David W.E. Roberts" <> randomly hit the keyboard and
    produced:

    >This is,
    >after all, what the BCO will require before granting planning permission.


    Planning Permission is separate from Building Control. Planning
    Permission wouldn't be contingent on the foundations being adequate.
    --
    Hugo Nebula
    "The fact that no-one on the internet wants a piece of this
    shows you just how far you've strayed from the pack".
     
    Hugo Nebula, May 9, 2004
    #8
  9. "Hugo Nebula" <> wrote in message
    news:eek:...
    > On Sat, 8 May 2004 13:57:26 +0100, a particular chimpanzee named
    > "David W.E. Roberts" <> randomly hit the keyboard and
    > produced:
    >
    > >This is,
    > >after all, what the BCO will require before granting planning permission.

    >
    > Planning Permission is separate from Building Control. Planning
    > Permission wouldn't be contingent on the foundations being adequate.


    Yep - guess I missed out a stage.
    If you got planning permission then the BCO would inspect the foundations to
    ensure that they were adequate when you started the build process.
    The point is still valid, though - at some point there will be a BCO
    inspecting the foundations.
    If they are not adequate then this will have to be fixed.
    Realistically this should happen when the plans are being drawn up - you
    can't plan or get proper quotes if you don't know if the foundations are
    adequate.

    So you should really have this checked out before you commit to buying the
    property, unless you are happy to price on a 'worst case' scenario which
    includes underpinning and/or other work as required to provide adequate
    foundations.

    Cheers
    Dave R

    P.S. presumably then if you submit plans for a second storey and then find
    the existing structure isn't adequate to support the second storey, you may
    have to go back to the planning office to change the proposal if you decide
    to do anything other than underpin the existing foundations. Seems the long
    wrong way to do things.
     
    David W.E. Roberts, May 9, 2004
    #9
  10. Steve Buckley

    IMM Guest

    "Steve Buckley" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hi All,
    >
    > It's a tough question I know but what would be a ballpark figure to
    > add a second storey to the following
    >
    > 1950's bungalow
    > currently has a slate pitched roof
    > 40'wide by 27' deep
    > Located in Bolton, (North west)
    >
    > I'm just looking for a ballpark figure, i.e. 20k? 50k? 100k? 150k?!
    >
    > Depending on this cost we may/maynot buy the house. There may be other
    > option such as adding a dorma but a 2nd storey would be the way to go,
    > it sit in a row of large houses so planning SHOULD be ok (!)


    Depending on foundations, which most certainly will not be adequate
    (building don't dig one extra inch), it is probably worth demolishing the
    bungalow and building a new house. Even if the foundations were adequate,
    the cost difference may not be that great. Also the old 1950s structure
    would not an ounce of insulation in it making it expensive to heat. The new
    house can then be to your own design and much more comfortable to live in.
    You could go for an eco design for not much extra, if at all. There are
    numerous timber frame companies about that will provide very good houses to
    your own spec.
     
    IMM, May 9, 2004
    #10
  11. Steve Buckley

    IMM Guest

    "IMM" <> wrote in message
    news:c7l41q$m38$...
    >
    > "Steve Buckley" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > Hi All,
    > >
    > > It's a tough question I know but what would be a ballpark figure to
    > > add a second storey to the following
    > >
    > > 1950's bungalow
    > > currently has a slate pitched roof
    > > 40'wide by 27' deep
    > > Located in Bolton, (North west)
    > >
    > > I'm just looking for a ballpark figure, i.e. 20k? 50k? 100k? 150k?!
    > >
    > > Depending on this cost we may/maynot buy the house. There may be other
    > > option such as adding a dorma but a 2nd storey would be the way to go,
    > > it sit in a row of large houses so planning SHOULD be ok (!)

    >
    > Depending on foundations, which most certainly will not be adequate
    > (building don't dig one extra inch), it is probably worth demolishing the
    > bungalow and building a new house. Even if the foundations were adequate,
    > the cost difference may not be that great. Also the old 1950s structure
    > would not an ounce of insulation in it making it expensive to heat. The

    new
    > house can then be to your own design and much more comfortable to live in.
    > You could go for an eco design for not much extra, if at all. There are
    > numerous timber frame companies about that will provide very good houses

    to
    > your own spec.


    Also you don't pay VAT on a new build.
     
    IMM, May 9, 2004
    #11
  12. Steve Buckley

    Owain Guest

    "IMM" wrote
    | > Depending on foundations, which most certainly will not be adequate
    | > (building don't dig one extra inch), it is probably worth demolishing
    the
    | > bungalow and building a new house. Even if the foundations were
    adequate,
    | > the cost difference may not be that great.

    And if digging down for new foundations, may be possible to put a basement
    in.

    | Also you don't pay VAT on a new build.

    At the moment, but there have been rumblings about that ...

    Owain
     
    Owain, May 9, 2004
    #12
  13. Steve Buckley

    Steve Guest

    "IMM" <> wrote in message
    news:c7l455$mru$...
    >
    > "IMM" <> wrote in message
    > news:c7l41q$m38$...
    > >
    > > "Steve Buckley" <> wrote in message
    > > news:...
    > > > Hi All,
    > > >
    > > > It's a tough question I know but what would be a ballpark figure to
    > > > add a second storey to the following
    > > >
    > > > 1950's bungalow
    > > > currently has a slate pitched roof
    > > > 40'wide by 27' deep
    > > > Located in Bolton, (North west)
    > > >
    > > > I'm just looking for a ballpark figure, i.e. 20k? 50k? 100k? 150k?!
    > > >
    > > > Depending on this cost we may/maynot buy the house. There may be other
    > > > option such as adding a dorma but a 2nd storey would be the way to go,
    > > > it sit in a row of large houses so planning SHOULD be ok (!)

    > >
    > > Depending on foundations, which most certainly will not be adequate
    > > (building don't dig one extra inch), it is probably worth demolishing

    the
    > > bungalow and building a new house. Even if the foundations were

    adequate,
    > > the cost difference may not be that great. Also the old 1950s structure
    > > would not an ounce of insulation in it making it expensive to heat. The

    > new
    > > house can then be to your own design and much more comfortable to live

    in.
    > > You could go for an eco design for not much extra, if at all. There are
    > > numerous timber frame companies about that will provide very good houses

    > to
    > > your own spec.

    >
    > Also you don't pay VAT on a new build.
    >

    Thanks for your advice, the zero vat bit is especially intersting.
     
    Steve, May 9, 2004
    #13
  14. Steve Buckley

    Steve Guest

    "David W.E. Roberts" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > "Hugo Nebula" <> wrote in message
    > news:eek:...
    > > On Sat, 8 May 2004 13:57:26 +0100, a particular chimpanzee named
    > > "David W.E. Roberts" <> randomly hit the keyboard and
    > > produced:
    > >
    > > >This is,
    > > >after all, what the BCO will require before granting planning

    permission.
    > >
    > > Planning Permission is separate from Building Control. Planning
    > > Permission wouldn't be contingent on the foundations being adequate.

    >
    > Yep - guess I missed out a stage.
    > If you got planning permission then the BCO would inspect the foundations

    to
    > ensure that they were adequate when you started the build process.
    > The point is still valid, though - at some point there will be a BCO
    > inspecting the foundations.
    > If they are not adequate then this will have to be fixed.
    > Realistically this should happen when the plans are being drawn up - you
    > can't plan or get proper quotes if you don't know if the foundations are
    > adequate.
    >
    > So you should really have this checked out before you commit to buying the
    > property, unless you are happy to price on a 'worst case' scenario which
    > includes underpinning and/or other work as required to provide adequate
    > foundations.
    >
    > Cheers
    > Dave R
    >
    > P.S. presumably then if you submit plans for a second storey and then find
    > the existing structure isn't adequate to support the second storey, you

    may
    > have to go back to the planning office to change the proposal if you

    decide
    > to do anything other than underpin the existing foundations. Seems the

    long
    > wrong way to do things.



    Thanks for the info, all good stuff. We've actually had our offer accepted
    on this property so we'll have to look at all possible ways we can extend
    the place. I like the idea of putting in I-Beams but the logical plans seems
    to be to get a builders opinion then maybe dig down into the foundations and
    see how good/bad they are, no point using IBeams if the structure will
    support the extra weight. The bungalow is probably 1940's (ish).
    If we can avoid it we wouldn't want to demolish the building.

    Thanks again, I'll no doubt be back with more news/advice soon!

    Steve
     
    Steve, May 9, 2004
    #14
  15. Steve Buckley

    IMM Guest

    "Owain" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > "IMM" wrote
    > | > Depending on foundations, which most certainly will not be adequate
    > | > (building don't dig one extra inch), it is probably worth demolishing
    > the
    > | > bungalow and building a new house. Even if the foundations were
    > adequate,
    > | > the cost difference may not be that great.
    >
    > And if digging down for new foundations, may be possible to put a basement
    > in.
    >
    > | Also you don't pay VAT on a new build.
    >
    > At the moment,


    And that is what matters.

    > but there have been rumblings about that ...
    >
    > Owain
    >
    >
     
    IMM, May 9, 2004
    #15
  16. Steve Buckley

    IMM Guest

    "David W.E. Roberts" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > "Steve Buckley" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > Hi All,
    > >
    > > It's a tough question I know but what would be a ballpark figure to
    > > add a second storey to the following
    > >
    > > 1950's bungalow
    > > currently has a slate pitched roof
    > > 40'wide by 27' deep
    > > Located in Bolton, (North west)
    > >
    > > I'm just looking for a ballpark figure, i.e. 20k? 50k? 100k? 150k?!
    > >
    > > Depending on this cost we may/maynot buy the house. There may be other
    > > option such as adding a dorma but a 2nd storey would be the way to go,
    > > it sit in a row of large houses so planning SHOULD be ok (!)

    >
    > (1) Go talk to a local builder - they are more likely to know what

    building
    > costs are in your area.


    40 foot x 27 foot. A 3 bedroom house. You can have one buillt using timber
    frame for 80K inc two bathrooms and all fitted out.

    > They may also have some idea of how solid the
    > foundations are in that age of house, though you should have a surveyor

    dig
    > a trial pit alongside the foundations if you are really serious. This is,
    > after all, what the BCO will require before granting planning permission.
    >
    > (2) A friend built his bungalow up to 2 storeys, and did a very nice job

    of
    > it too. He suspended the second storey on a framework of I-beams so it
    > placed no load on the existing walls - apparently better than trying to
    > upgrade the foundations (presumably you would have to go all round the

    house
    > digging out the existing fundations and underpinning before you could

    build
    > upwards). Looking at the house you would never guess it started life as a
    > bungalow.


    Sounds the complicated difficult way. It probably would be better
    demolishing. In 99% of cases it is.
     
    IMM, May 9, 2004
    #16
  17. Steve Buckley

    Brian S Gray Guest

    On Sat, 8 May 2004 11:33:29 +0100, "nightjar"
    <nightjar@<insert_my_surname_here>.uk.com> wrote:

    >
    >"Steve Buckley" <> wrote in message
    >news:...
    >> Hi All,
    >>
    >> It's a tough question I know but what would be a ballpark figure to
    >> add a second storey to the following
    >>
    >> 1950's bungalow
    >> currently has a slate pitched roof
    >> 40'wide by 27' deep
    >> Located in Bolton, (North west)

    >
    >My guess would be that the foundations are probably not up to modern
    >requirements for a second story. My house had a single storey extension
    >added about 25 years ago, with foundations designed to take a second storey,
    >if required. When I extended my detached garage a few years ago, the
    >foundations required for that were twice as deep as I have on the house
    >extension.
    >
    >Colin Bignell
    >

    I would not be surprised if the foundations were not up to
    standard but that is not necessarily the whole story for BCO's.
    In this area of Cheshire, sometime around 1960 ( I do not know
    exactly when) it became a requirement that the foundations for single
    storey parts of larger houses (and probably for bungalows) had to be
    adequate to take a second storey .
    In 1964 I bought a new house and about 1972 decided to build
    extra bedrooms on top of the garage and single storey half of the
    kitchen. Being a suspicious character, I borrowed a sledge hammer and
    dug a hole in a concrete path and examined the foundations of the
    single storey section of the house.which were about a metre down in
    sand. I found that the walls of the trench had partially collapsed
    before the concrete for the footings was poured and the latter had a
    triangular section instead of rectangular.
    The council whose BCO came to discuss the permissible
    extension design was the council which had been responsible for
    supervising construction! The officer involved in my discussions
    suddenly became very interested in lightweight extensions after being
    dead against them before he looked in my holes.
    The long and the short of it was that I had the foundations
    improved and built a conventional brick extension.
    Finally, in this area I think there is a blanket ban on
    demolition of a small house and rebuilding as a larger house. Check
    with your council. How much you can leave behind and then build on a
    large extension is another, and often contentious, matter!
     
    Brian S Gray, May 9, 2004
    #17
  18. Steve Buckley

    Steve Guest

    "Brian S Gray" <-net.com> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Sat, 8 May 2004 11:33:29 +0100, "nightjar"
    > <nightjar@<insert_my_surname_here>.uk.com> wrote:
    >
    > >
    > >"Steve Buckley" <> wrote in message
    > >news:...
    > >> Hi All,
    > >>
    > >> It's a tough question I know but what would be a ballpark figure to
    > >> add a second storey to the following
    > >>
    > >> 1950's bungalow
    > >> currently has a slate pitched roof
    > >> 40'wide by 27' deep
    > >> Located in Bolton, (North west)

    > >
    > >My guess would be that the foundations are probably not up to modern
    > >requirements for a second story. My house had a single storey extension
    > >added about 25 years ago, with foundations designed to take a second

    storey,
    > >if required. When I extended my detached garage a few years ago, the
    > >foundations required for that were twice as deep as I have on the house
    > >extension.
    > >
    > >Colin Bignell
    > >

    > I would not be surprised if the foundations were not up to
    > standard but that is not necessarily the whole story for BCO's.
    > In this area of Cheshire, sometime around 1960 ( I do not know
    > exactly when) it became a requirement that the foundations for single
    > storey parts of larger houses (and probably for bungalows) had to be
    > adequate to take a second storey .
    > In 1964 I bought a new house and about 1972 decided to build
    > extra bedrooms on top of the garage and single storey half of the
    > kitchen. Being a suspicious character, I borrowed a sledge hammer and
    > dug a hole in a concrete path and examined the foundations of the
    > single storey section of the house.which were about a metre down in
    > sand. I found that the walls of the trench had partially collapsed
    > before the concrete for the footings was poured and the latter had a
    > triangular section instead of rectangular.
    > The council whose BCO came to discuss the permissible
    > extension design was the council which had been responsible for
    > supervising construction! The officer involved in my discussions
    > suddenly became very interested in lightweight extensions after being
    > dead against them before he looked in my holes.
    > The long and the short of it was that I had the foundations
    > improved and built a conventional brick extension.
    > Finally, in this area I think there is a blanket ban on
    > demolition of a small house and rebuilding as a larger house. Check
    > with your council. How much you can leave behind and then build on a
    > large extension is another, and often contentious, matter!


    I believe this to be the case in Bolton, particularly in this are of Bolton
    where a lot of old houses have been demolished to make way for larger
    houses/flats,
     
    Steve, May 9, 2004
    #18
  19. Steve Buckley

    Steve Guest

    "IMM" <> wrote in message
    news:c7loip$6ot$...
    >
    > "David W.E. Roberts" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > >
    > > "Steve Buckley" <> wrote in message
    > > news:...
    > > > Hi All,
    > > >
    > > > It's a tough question I know but what would be a ballpark figure to
    > > > add a second storey to the following
    > > >
    > > > 1950's bungalow
    > > > currently has a slate pitched roof
    > > > 40'wide by 27' deep
    > > > Located in Bolton, (North west)
    > > >
    > > > I'm just looking for a ballpark figure, i.e. 20k? 50k? 100k? 150k?!
    > > >
    > > > Depending on this cost we may/maynot buy the house. There may be other
    > > > option such as adding a dorma but a 2nd storey would be the way to go,
    > > > it sit in a row of large houses so planning SHOULD be ok (!)

    > >
    > > (1) Go talk to a local builder - they are more likely to know what

    > building
    > > costs are in your area.

    >
    > 40 foot x 27 foot. A 3 bedroom house. You can have one buillt using

    timber
    > frame for 80K inc two bathrooms and all fitted out.
    >
    > > They may also have some idea of how solid the
    > > foundations are in that age of house, though you should have a surveyor

    > dig
    > > a trial pit alongside the foundations if you are really serious. This

    is,
    > > after all, what the BCO will require before granting planning

    permission.
    > >
    > > (2) A friend built his bungalow up to 2 storeys, and did a very nice job

    > of
    > > it too. He suspended the second storey on a framework of I-beams so it
    > > placed no load on the existing walls - apparently better than trying to
    > > upgrade the foundations (presumably you would have to go all round the

    > house
    > > digging out the existing fundations and underpinning before you could

    > build
    > > upwards). Looking at the house you would never guess it started life as

    a
    > > bungalow.

    >
    > Sounds the complicated difficult way. It probably would be better
    > demolishing. In 99% of cases it is.


    Roughly what would demolishion cost? 20k? I have no idea.

    As I've said in a nother post it seems unlikely that a demolishion would be
    allowed, alothugh adding another storey would! The end effect is the same so
    you wonder why demolishion/rebuild wouldn't be allowed. Oh well, I'll find
    all this out for definite in the next few months!
     
    Steve, May 9, 2004
    #19
  20. Steve Buckley

    IMM Guest

    "Steve" <> wrote in message
    news:gwxnc.2028$9.net...
    >
    > "IMM" <> wrote in message
    > news:c7loip$6ot$...
    > >
    > > "David W.E. Roberts" <> wrote in message
    > > news:...
    > > >
    > > > "Steve Buckley" <> wrote in message
    > > > news:...
    > > > > Hi All,
    > > > >
    > > > > It's a tough question I know but what would be a ballpark figure to
    > > > > add a second storey to the following
    > > > >
    > > > > 1950's bungalow
    > > > > currently has a slate pitched roof
    > > > > 40'wide by 27' deep
    > > > > Located in Bolton, (North west)
    > > > >
    > > > > I'm just looking for a ballpark figure, i.e. 20k? 50k? 100k? 150k?!
    > > > >
    > > > > Depending on this cost we may/maynot buy the house. There may be

    other
    > > > > option such as adding a dorma but a 2nd storey would be the way to

    go,
    > > > > it sit in a row of large houses so planning SHOULD be ok (!)
    > > >
    > > > (1) Go talk to a local builder - they are more likely to know what

    > > building
    > > > costs are in your area.

    > >
    > > 40 foot x 27 foot. A 3 bedroom house. You can have one buillt using

    > timber
    > > frame for 80K inc two bathrooms and all fitted out.
    > >
    > > > They may also have some idea of how solid the
    > > > foundations are in that age of house, though you should have a

    surveyor
    > > dig
    > > > a trial pit alongside the foundations if you are really serious. This

    > is,
    > > > after all, what the BCO will require before granting planning

    > permission.
    > > >
    > > > (2) A friend built his bungalow up to 2 storeys, and did a very nice

    job
    > > of
    > > > it too. He suspended the second storey on a framework of I-beams so it
    > > > placed no load on the existing walls - apparently better than trying

    to
    > > > upgrade the foundations (presumably you would have to go all round the

    > > house
    > > > digging out the existing fundations and underpinning before you could

    > > build
    > > > upwards). Looking at the house you would never guess it started life

    as
    > a
    > > > bungalow.

    > >
    > > Sounds the complicated difficult way. It probably would be better
    > > demolishing. In 99% of cases it is.

    >
    > Roughly what would demolishion cost? 20k? I have no idea.


    Anything from 600-1,000 for a bungalow. That is no ripping out the
    foundations. The groundworkers for the new house probably would do that.

    > As I've said in a nother post it seems unlikely that a demolishion would

    be
    > allowed, alothugh adding another storey would! The end effect is the same

    so
    > you wonder why demolishion/rebuild wouldn't be allowed. Oh well, I'll find
    > all this out for definite in the next few months!
    >
    >
    >
     
    IMM, May 9, 2004
    #20
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