about EXTENSION CORDS (safety)

Discussion in 'Home Repair' started by David_nj_7@mailbolt.com, Aug 2, 2006.

  1. Guest

    I posted awhile back about getting a dehumidifier for the apartment I
    live in and discussed some of the pros and cons of that and the
    possibility of getting an air conditioner.


    Well, there is a small window in the bathroom that will accept a small
    5000 BTU (1000w) air conditioning unit. I know this is very small but
    my friend has a 5000 BTU unit which does a DECENT job of cooling his
    studio apartment. It's not great, but better than nothing.


    Problem is, on this 5000BTU Whirlpool unit I am thinking of putting in
    the window. (it barely fits, but does fit.) ... there are all kinds of

    warnings about NOT using an extension cord with this unit. They
    mention about plugging it in within 4 feet of the unit etc....


    Now, I know extension cords can have their issues, but do they make
    extension cords that can handle the 1000 watt 13 amps that this unit
    requires? Are they just erring on the side of safety by making the
    blanket statement of NO EXTENSION CORDS! Kinda like a disclaimer sort
    of thing.


    Would I be able to SAFELY get and use an extension cord with this unit?

    Something I could pick up at LOWES or HOME DEPOT.


    Thanks


    DAVID
     
    , Aug 2, 2006
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. zxcvbob Guest

    wrote:
    > I posted awhile back about getting a dehumidifier for the apartment I
    > live in and discussed some of the pros and cons of that and the
    > possibility of getting an air conditioner.
    >
    >
    > Well, there is a small window in the bathroom that will accept a small
    > 5000 BTU (1000w) air conditioning unit. I know this is very small but
    > my friend has a 5000 BTU unit which does a DECENT job of cooling his
    > studio apartment. It's not great, but better than nothing.
    >
    >
    > Problem is, on this 5000BTU Whirlpool unit I am thinking of putting in
    > the window. (it barely fits, but does fit.) ... there are all kinds of
    >
    > warnings about NOT using an extension cord with this unit. They
    > mention about plugging it in within 4 feet of the unit etc....
    >
    >
    > Now, I know extension cords can have their issues, but do they make
    > extension cords that can handle the 1000 watt 13 amps that this unit
    > requires? Are they just erring on the side of safety by making the
    > blanket statement of NO EXTENSION CORDS! Kinda like a disclaimer sort
    > of thing.
    >
    >
    > Would I be able to SAFELY get and use an extension cord with this unit?
    >
    > Something I could pick up at LOWES or HOME DEPOT.
    >
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    >
    > DAVID




    They are just covering their rather large ass, so if you cut the
    grounding pin off and plug it into a 20 foot 16 gauge zipcord extension
    with frayed ends and your house burns down it's not their fault.

    They are also concerned about the compressor not starting if there's too
    much voltage drop in the cord.

    Go to Lowes or HD and buy a 6' or 9' *appliance* extension cord. If
    that's not long enough, buy the shortest 12 gauge extension cord that
    will get the git r done.

    And if you burn your house down, it's not my fault ;-)

    Bob
     
    zxcvbob, Aug 2, 2006
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > I posted awhile back about getting a dehumidifier for the apartment I
    > live in and discussed some of the pros and cons of that and the
    > possibility of getting an air conditioner.
    >
    >
    > Well, there is a small window in the bathroom that will accept a small
    > 5000 BTU (1000w) air conditioning unit. I know this is very small but
    > my friend has a 5000 BTU unit which does a DECENT job of cooling his
    > studio apartment. It's not great, but better than nothing.
    >
    >
    > Problem is, on this 5000BTU Whirlpool unit I am thinking of putting in
    > the window. (it barely fits, but does fit.) ... there are all kinds of
    >
    > warnings about NOT using an extension cord with this unit. They
    > mention about plugging it in within 4 feet of the unit etc....
    >
    >
    > Now, I know extension cords can have their issues, but do they make
    > extension cords that can handle the 1000 watt 13 amps that this unit
    > requires? Are they just erring on the side of safety by making the
    > blanket statement of NO EXTENSION CORDS! Kinda like a disclaimer sort
    > of thing.
    >
    >
    > Would I be able to SAFELY get and use an extension cord with this unit?
    >
    > Something I could pick up at LOWES or HOME DEPOT.
    >
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    >
    > DAVID
    >


    So you are planning on running an extension cord in the bathroom? I would
    have to advise against that. The bathroom is unsafe enough as it is without
    you running a cord over things.
     
    John Grabowski, Aug 2, 2006
    #3
  4. Pete C. Guest

    wrote:
    >
    > I posted awhile back about getting a dehumidifier for the apartment I
    > live in and discussed some of the pros and cons of that and the
    > possibility of getting an air conditioner.
    >
    > Well, there is a small window in the bathroom that will accept a small
    > 5000 BTU (1000w) air conditioning unit. I know this is very small but
    > my friend has a 5000 BTU unit which does a DECENT job of cooling his
    > studio apartment. It's not great, but better than nothing.
    >
    > Problem is, on this 5000BTU Whirlpool unit I am thinking of putting in
    > the window. (it barely fits, but does fit.) ... there are all kinds of
    >
    > warnings about NOT using an extension cord with this unit. They
    > mention about plugging it in within 4 feet of the unit etc....
    >
    > Now, I know extension cords can have their issues, but do they make
    > extension cords that can handle the 1000 watt 13 amps that this unit
    > requires? Are they just erring on the side of safety by making the
    > blanket statement of NO EXTENSION CORDS! Kinda like a disclaimer sort
    > of thing.
    >
    > Would I be able to SAFELY get and use an extension cord with this unit?
    >
    > Something I could pick up at LOWES or HOME DEPOT.
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    > DAVID


    There is nothing inherently unsafe about extension cords, after all they
    are just wire and connectors little different from the fixed wiring in
    your home.

    The problem comes in with the abundance of poorly made light gauge
    extension cords on the market. These do ok for occasional use with light
    loads, but the cheap molded ends quickly loose contact pressure
    resulting in higher contact resistance and heating, and the strain
    reliefs fail in a few uses resulting in individual exposed conductors
    and greater risk of damage. Of course there is also the fact that many
    of these cords are light gauge wire and will cause excessive voltage
    drop during the A/C startup which could cause the compressor to fail to
    start and burnout.

    An extension cord of the proper gauge wire and quality ends will be
    safe, but it also won't be $4.99 either. The heavy 12ga extension cords
    you can find at Depot or Lowe's in the shortest length that will reach
    properly will do the job if they are installed and left in place. Most
    of them still suffer from the low quality ends that will fail with
    repeated use.

    I make my own extension cords with quality 12/3 SJO cord (US made in
    250' spools) and quality ends from Leviton or even better Hubble. Ends
    up costing more than the pre made stuff but is much higher quality and
    more reliable.

    Pete C.
     
    Pete C., Aug 2, 2006
    #4
  5. IGot2P Guest

    wrote:

    > I posted awhile back about getting a dehumidifier for the apartment I
    > live in and discussed some of the pros and cons of that and the
    > possibility of getting an air conditioner.
    >
    >
    > Well, there is a small window in the bathroom that will accept a small
    > 5000 BTU (1000w) air conditioning unit. I know this is very small but
    > my friend has a 5000 BTU unit which does a DECENT job of cooling his
    > studio apartment. It's not great, but better than nothing.
    >
    >
    > Problem is, on this 5000BTU Whirlpool unit I am thinking of putting in
    > the window. (it barely fits, but does fit.) ... there are all kinds of
    >
    > warnings about NOT using an extension cord with this unit. They
    > mention about plugging it in within 4 feet of the unit etc....
    >
    >
    > Now, I know extension cords can have their issues, but do they make
    > extension cords that can handle the 1000 watt 13 amps that this unit
    > requires? Are they just erring on the side of safety by making the
    > blanket statement of NO EXTENSION CORDS! Kinda like a disclaimer sort
    > of thing.
    >
    >
    > Would I be able to SAFELY get and use an extension cord with this unit?
    >
    > Something I could pick up at LOWES or HOME DEPOT.
    >
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    >
    > DAVID
    >


    Are you sure that it is going to be pulling 1,000 watts? This seems VERY
    high for a 5,000 BTU unit. In fact I just looked at a 6,100 BTU unit
    that I have plugged into a watt meter and it was only pulling about 600
    watts when set in "hi cool". Given, it would no doubt pull more when
    starting up.

    Don
     
    IGot2P, Aug 2, 2006
    #5
  6. On 2 Aug 2006 11:11:43 -0700, wrote:

    >I posted awhile back about getting a dehumidifier for the apartment I
    >live in and discussed some of the pros and cons of that and the
    >possibility of getting an air conditioner.
    >
    >
    >Well, there is a small window in the bathroom that will accept a small
    >5000 BTU (1000w) air conditioning unit. I know this is very small but
    >my friend has a 5000 BTU unit which does a DECENT job of cooling his
    >studio apartment. It's not great, but better than nothing.
    >
    >
    >Problem is, on this 5000BTU Whirlpool unit I am thinking of putting in
    >the window. (it barely fits, but does fit.) ... there are all kinds of
    >
    >warnings about NOT using an extension cord with this unit. They
    >mention about plugging it in within 4 feet of the unit etc....
    >
    >
    >Now, I know extension cords can have their issues, but do they make
    >extension cords that can handle the 1000 watt 13 amps that this unit
    >requires? Are they just erring on the side of safety by making the
    >blanket statement of NO EXTENSION CORDS! Kinda like a disclaimer sort
    >of thing.
    >
    >
    >Would I be able to SAFELY get and use an extension cord with this unit?
    >
    > Something I could pick up at LOWES or HOME DEPOT.
    >
    >
    >Thanks
    >
    >
    >DAVID


    How long of an extension cord? That makes a HUGE difference.

    CWM
     
    Charlie Morgan, Aug 2, 2006
    #6
  7. Guest

    On 2 Aug 2006 11:11:43 -0700, wrote:

    >I posted awhile back about getting a dehumidifier for the apartment I
    >live in and discussed some of the pros and cons of that and the
    >possibility of getting an air conditioner.
    >
    >
    >Well, there is a small window in the bathroom that will accept a small
    >5000 BTU (1000w) air conditioning unit. I know this is very small but
    >my friend has a 5000 BTU unit which does a DECENT job of cooling his
    >studio apartment. It's not great, but better than nothing.
    >
    >
    >Problem is, on this 5000BTU Whirlpool unit I am thinking of putting in
    >the window. (it barely fits, but does fit.) ... there are all kinds of
    >
    >warnings about NOT using an extension cord with this unit. They
    >mention about plugging it in within 4 feet of the unit etc....
    >
    >
    >Now, I know extension cords can have their issues, but do they make
    >extension cords that can handle the 1000 watt 13 amps that this unit
    >requires? Are they just erring on the side of safety by making the
    >blanket statement of NO EXTENSION CORDS! Kinda like a disclaimer sort
    >of thing.
    >
    >
    >Would I be able to SAFELY get and use an extension cord with this unit?
    >
    > Something I could pick up at LOWES or HOME DEPOT.
    >
    >
    >Thanks
    >
    >
    >DAVID


    Go to your local electrical supply store and buy a spool of #00
    triplex. Connect this to your electrical service panel, and use a 20A
    breaker. Use the bare wire for the ground, the two blacks for the hot
    and neutral, and place an electrical box and an outlet on the other
    end. Run this cable from your basement to the AC. You can either
    leave the outlet lay on the floor or mount it to the wall. Having
    this triplex cable strung thru the house is ugly, but you wont run
    short on power.

    Gaze
     
    , Aug 3, 2006
    #7
  8. Mark Lloyd Guest

    On Wed, 02 Aug 2006 20:17:16 -0500, Jim Redelfs
    <> wrote:

    >In article <>,
    > wrote:
    >
    >> Now, I know extension cords can have their issues, but do they make
    >> extension cords that can handle the 1000 watt 13 amps that this unit
    >> requires?

    >
    >Yes. ...and for good reason.
    >
    >You are, sadly, probably the EXCEPTION to the rule that most consumers are
    >STUPID. You are already ahead of the curve having ASKED the question.
    >
    >I entered a customer's mobile home during an extremely hot day to install a
    >telephone outlet. I moved the couch only to find that the window air
    >conditioner was plugged-into a "zip" cord (lamp cord ?18ga?) extension cord.


    Some older extension cords used 18ga. wire, but the newer ones use 16.
    The 16 CLAIMS to be able to carry 13A, but probably should have no
    more than 10.

    [snip]
    --
    Mark Lloyd
    http://notstupid.laughingsquid.com

    "Democracy is two wolves and a lamb voting on what
    to have for lunch. Liberty is a well armed lamb
    contesting the vote." - Benjamin Franklin
     
    Mark Lloyd, Aug 3, 2006
    #8
  9. Guest

    Re: about EXTENSION CORDS (safety)

    I had a customer in a mall plug their Seal dry mount press 1500 watts
    in a ungrounded 18 gauge light cord extension cord.

    I warned them it was unsafe documented it on my paperwork when fixing
    their unit.

    Abiut 6 months later I was back and noted not only had they not
    replaced the extension but they stapled it to a carpeted wall:(

    I fixed the machine and while waiting for it to heat went to a hardware
    store and bought a air conditioner extension cord 12 gauge grounded.

    the customer got mad when I cut their undersized cord into pieces and
    used the brand new cord I just bought.

    HEY you cant charge us for that! they were mad.

    Its a gift 12 bucks wat less than a insurance claim, less than the
    p[aper for all the forms that will need filled in.

    they were pissed customer never called again. heck they could of burnt
    down s hills village
     
    , Aug 3, 2006
    #9
  10. Guest

    Re: about EXTENSION CORDS (safety)

    wrote:
    > I posted awhile back about getting a dehumidifier for the apartment I
    > live in and discussed some of the pros and cons of that and the
    > possibility of getting an air conditioner.
    >
    >
    > Well, there is a small window in the bathroom that will accept a small
    > 5000 BTU (1000w) air conditioning unit. I know this is very small but
    > my friend has a 5000 BTU unit which does a DECENT job of cooling his
    > studio apartment. It's not great, but better than nothing.
    >
    >
    > Problem is, on this 5000BTU Whirlpool unit I am thinking of putting in
    > the window. (it barely fits, but does fit.) ... there are all kinds of
    >
    > warnings about NOT using an extension cord with this unit. They
    > mention about plugging it in within 4 feet of the unit etc....
    >
    >
    > Now, I know extension cords can have their issues, but do they make
    > extension cords that can handle the 1000 watt 13 amps that this unit
    > requires? Are they just erring on the side of safety by making the
    > blanket statement of NO EXTENSION CORDS! Kinda like a disclaimer sort
    > of thing.
    >
    >
    > Would I be able to SAFELY get and use an extension cord with this unit?
    >
    > Something I could pick up at LOWES or HOME DEPOT.
    >
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    >
    > DAVID


    2 thoughts on top of the 10 or so others-

    1) If I were to plug something hot-n-heavy into an outlet, and wanted
    the best chance of having minimal losses, I'd swap the outlet to a
    commercial outlet. If it were a 20A circuit, I'd put on a 20A outlet.

    2) If a suitable (outlet) circuit exists that runs reasonably near the
    location, you could (or could have an electrician) convert an outlet to
    a box that would then go to surface conduit that could run the outlet
    to the desired location. Your landlord may go nuts over this, though.
    To make this solution better, go from the 1st outlet in a chain, and
    disconnect the chain. Since this is in a bathroom, the bathroom may be
    on its own breaker.

    3) If you supply the money, will the landlord supply an electrician to
    place an outlet?

    D
     
    , Aug 3, 2006
    #10
  11. Pete C. Guest

    Re: about EXTENSION CORDS (safety)

    "" wrote:
    >
    > I had a customer in a mall plug their Seal dry mount press 1500 watts
    > in a ungrounded 18 gauge light cord extension cord.
    >
    > I warned them it was unsafe documented it on my paperwork when fixing
    > their unit.
    >
    > Abiut 6 months later I was back and noted not only had they not
    > replaced the extension but they stapled it to a carpeted wall:(
    >
    > I fixed the machine and while waiting for it to heat went to a hardware
    > store and bought a air conditioner extension cord 12 gauge grounded.
    >
    > the customer got mad when I cut their undersized cord into pieces and
    > used the brand new cord I just bought.
    >
    > HEY you cant charge us for that! they were mad.
    >
    > Its a gift 12 bucks wat less than a insurance claim, less than the
    > p[aper for all the forms that will need filled in.
    >
    > they were pissed customer never called again. heck they could of burnt
    > down s hills village


    Good move, for small stuff like that it's easier to spend a few $ and
    count it as your good deed for the day. Besides burning down the mall
    after hours, it could quite possibly have gone up during the day and
    resulted in an evacuation and possible injuries.

    Pete C.
     
    Pete C., Aug 3, 2006
    #11
  12. Guest

    Re: about EXTENSION CORDS (safety)

    > Good move, for small stuff like that it's easier to spend a few $ and
    > count it as your good deed for the day. Besides burning down the mall
    > after hours, it could quite possibly have gone up during the day and
    > resulted in an evacuation and possible injuries.
    >
    > Pete C.


    let alone the ungrounded machine, they carry high current and
    occasionally have wires burn off and hit the metal frame, real hock
    hazard there.

    yesterday I found a 16 gauge extension cord taped to a walk way
    powering a 20 amp unit. i suggested they move the unit a few feet and
    plug it directly in wall.

    it amazes me there arent more fires caused by dumb stuff...............
     
    , Aug 3, 2006
    #12
  13. Bob Guest

    <> wrote in message
    news:...

    > Go to your local electrical supply store and buy a spool of #00
    > triplex. Connect this to your electrical service panel, and use a 20A
    > breaker. Use the bare wire for the ground, the two blacks for the hot
    > and neutral, and place an electrical box and an outlet on the other
    > end. Run this cable from your basement to the AC. You can either
    > leave the outlet lay on the floor or mount it to the wall. Having
    > this triplex cable strung thru the house is ugly, but you wont run
    > short on power.
    >
    > Gaze


    Safer, but only if done correctly. In addition to the QUAD, he'll need an AL
    rated breaker that is listed for 2/0 - probably 100 amps. On the AC side,
    he'll need a subpanel, and a 20 amp breaker, followed by an appropriate
    outlet. Also, since it's now a subpanel, it wouldn't hurt to drive a ground
    rod. While he's at it, he might as well mount his extension cord.

    Can't run triplex in a building without conduit for two reasons. The ground
    is exposed, the PE insulation burns readily. Also, and you need a grounded,
    and grounding conductor for the subpanel.
     
    Bob, Aug 3, 2006
    #13
  14. Mark Lloyd Guest

    On Thu, 03 Aug 2006 13:44:01 -0700, "<RJ>" <>
    wrote:

    >On Thu, 03 Aug 2006 13:43:46 -0500, Mark Lloyd <10> wrote:
    >
    >>>conditioner was plugged-into a "zip" cord (lamp cord ?18ga?) extension cord.

    >>
    >>Some older extension cords used 18ga. wire, but the newer ones use 16.
    >>The 16 CLAIMS to be able to carry 13A, but probably should have no
    >>more than 10.
    >>
    >>[snip]

    >
    >The wire'll do the job, but it's usually the connection
    >( outlet or plug ) that gets overheated.
    >


    If there's any markings on the ends, THEY often say 15A.

    >
    ><rj>

    --
    Mark Lloyd
    http://notstupid.laughingsquid.com

    "Democracy is two wolves and a lamb voting on what
    to have for lunch. Liberty is a well armed lamb
    contesting the vote." - Benjamin Franklin
     
    Mark Lloyd, Aug 3, 2006
    #14
  15. Bob Guest

    Re: about EXTENSION CORDS (safety)

    "Pete C." <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > "" wrote:
    >>
    >> I had a customer in a mall plug their Seal dry mount press 1500 watts
    >> in a ungrounded 18 gauge light cord extension cord.
    >>
    >> I warned them it was unsafe documented it on my paperwork when fixing
    >> their unit.
    >>
    >> Abiut 6 months later I was back and noted not only had they not
    >> replaced the extension but they stapled it to a carpeted wall:(
    >>
    >> I fixed the machine and while waiting for it to heat went to a hardware
    >> store and bought a air conditioner extension cord 12 gauge grounded.
    >>
    >> the customer got mad when I cut their undersized cord into pieces and
    >> used the brand new cord I just bought.
    >>
    >> HEY you cant charge us for that! they were mad.
    >>
    >> Its a gift 12 bucks wat less than a insurance claim, less than the
    >> p[aper for all the forms that will need filled in.
    >>
    >> they were pissed customer never called again. heck they could of burnt
    >> down s hills village

    >
    > Good move, for small stuff like that it's easier to spend a few $ and
    > count it as your good deed for the day. Besides burning down the mall
    > after hours, it could quite possibly have gone up during the day and
    > resulted in an evacuation and possible injuries.
    >
    > Pete C.


    Maybe a better path would have been to fix the unit, testing it by plugging
    it into a wall outlet, or your appropriately rated cord. After you were
    done, unplug the unit, explain that they need to put it where there's an
    outlet, and document in your report that there was nowhere to plug the unit
    in. "Can't we plug it back into the extension cord" they might ask...
    "Sorry, these units need to be plugged directly into the wall" They'll plug
    it back in when you leave, but they can't blame you for the fire, or someone
    tripping over the extension cord "that the dry mount press tech" installed.
    Hey, it's up to them.
     
    Bob, Aug 3, 2006
    #15
  16. mm Guest

    On Wed, 02 Aug 2006 16:26:10 -0500, IGot2P <> wrote:

    >>

    >
    >Are you sure that it is going to be pulling 1,000 watts? This seems VERY
    >high for a 5,000 BTU unit. In fact I just looked at a 6,100 BTU unit
    >that I have plugged into a watt meter and it was only pulling about 600
    >watts when set in "hi cool". Given, it would no doubt pull more when


    Just for the record, the difference btween lo cool and hi cool is only
    the speed of the fan. Barely any difference compared to the
    compressor and even to the draw of the fan in low speed.

    >starting up.
    >
    >Don
     
    mm, Aug 4, 2006
    #16
  17. mm Guest

    On Wed, 02 Aug 2006 17:41:34 -0400, Charlie Morgan <*@*.com> wrote:

    >
    >
    >How long of an extension cord? That makes a HUGE difference.
    >
    >CWM
    >

    Sure does. On a related note, I noticed this year how little time it
    takes to fill the toilet right above my water heater (and thus, very
    close to the street in terms of plumbing). 10 seconds or something,
    compared to 20 or 30 for the other toilets, even when their valves are
    wide open.
     
    mm, Aug 4, 2006
    #17
  18. Guest

    Re: about EXTENSION CORDS (safety)

    Hi... Thanks for all of the informative replies. After some careful
    thought with some excellent input from you guys, I have decided against
    the bathroom idea. I was more concerned about an electrical issue
    until I realized that the a cord in the bathroom with the added burden
    of moisture issues wasn't a bright idea. I would have possibly gotten
    the right cord and everything would have went fine with no cord or fire
    issues.... then, with my luck, someone would have gotten electrocuted.
    (@%$@&)

    I have just purchased a couple of high tech fans and will wait out the
    rest of the summer. The portable air conditioners I have seen are way
    to pricey ($300-500) and I'm not sure about how that would go with the
    fussy landlord.

    Thanks for all your help guys.

    DAVID
     
    , Aug 4, 2006
    #18
  19. Guest

    On Wed, 02 Aug 2006 18:28:24 GMT, "Joseph Meehan"
    <> wrote:

    >make sure it is designed
    >to handle at least twice the rated load on the A/C.



    Hmmm 13a x 2 is going to be a 10 guage cord. Why use a 10 guage cord
    on a circuit that is most likely going to be 14 guage all the way back
    to the panel?
     
    , Sep 2, 2006
    #19
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