A solution to stop doors slamming/being slammed?

Discussion in 'Misc DIY' started by dg, Oct 7, 2007.

  1. dg

    dg Guest

    I need a solution to stop doors being slammed by teenage kids, which
    in turn shakes the whole house.

    Mrs dg insists that it MUST be an ironmongery solution, and not
    related physical or surgical treatment, or sending the kids off to a
    care home.

    I've looked at the pneumatic kitchen cabinet closers, but these would
    not seem to fit on a normal internal door, and not be strong enough in
    any case.

    I've also looked at a dictator, but these seem obtrusive and need to
    work with a door closer mechanism. I don't want any annoying self
    closing doors

    The sponge things to prevent younger children from trapping their
    fingers are no good, as we need the doors to close.

    Are there any anti-slam products available for lightweight internal
    doors?

    dg
     
    dg, Oct 7, 2007
    #1
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  2. dg

    Lobster Guest

    dg wrote:
    > I need a solution to stop doors being slammed by teenage kids, which
    > in turn shakes the whole house.


    Tell me about it...

    We solved it instantly by threatening to unscrew daughter's
    bedroom door and removing it completely, indefinitely.

    Followed it through, just for one day, and then replaced it following
    day after much begging amd cajoling and promises of no repetition.

    Curiously enough, as a solution to slamming doors, it's worked an
    absolute treat - better than any other 'punishment' we've ever had to
    implement.

    No reason why it can't be extended to other doors - ie, you slam my
    kitchen door, then say bye bye to your bedroom door...

    David
     
    Lobster, Oct 7, 2007
    #2
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  3. dg

    Malcolm H Guest

    "dg" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >I need a solution to stop doors being slammed by teenage kids, which
    > in turn shakes the whole house.
    >
    > Mrs dg insists that it MUST be an ironmongery solution, and not
    > related physical or surgical treatment, or sending the kids off to a
    > care home.
    >
    > I've looked at the pneumatic kitchen cabinet closers, but these would
    > not seem to fit on a normal internal door, and not be strong enough in
    > any case.
    >
    > I've also looked at a dictator, but these seem obtrusive and need to
    > work with a door closer mechanism. I don't want any annoying self
    > closing doors
    >
    > The sponge things to prevent younger children from trapping their
    > fingers are no good, as we need the doors to close.
    >
    > Are there any anti-slam products available for lightweight internal
    > doors?
    >
    > dg


    I use a hydraulic (not pneumatic) door closer on the kitchen door and it
    works fine. They are, however, not cheap - and must be installed in
    accordance with the installation instructions.
     
    Malcolm H, Oct 7, 2007
    #3
  4. dg

    Guest

    On 7 Oct, 14:24, dg <> wrote:
    > I need a solution to stop doors being slammed by teenage kids, which
    > in turn shakes the whole house.
    >
    > Mrs dg insists that it MUST be an ironmongery solution, and not
    > related physical or surgical treatment, or sending the kids off to a
    > care home.
    >
    > I've looked at the pneumatic kitchen cabinet closers, but these would
    > not seem to fit on a normal internal door, and not be strong enough in
    > any case.
    >
    > I've also looked at a dictator, but these seem obtrusive and need to
    > work with a door closer mechanism. I don't want any annoying self
    > closing doors
    >
    > The sponge things to prevent younger children from trapping their
    > fingers are no good, as we need the doors to close.
    >
    > Are there any anti-slam products available for lightweight internal
    > doors?
    >
    > dg


    You bring back an old memory that my grandparents used to have a sort
    of scarf tied around the lock from one knob to the other. I think I
    was told it was to prevent slamming in their draughty Victorian house.
    Experiment shows it does work (though I don't have a British Standard
    teenager to do a proper test :). The thickness of material has to be
    selected according to the gap between door and frame such that it
    requires a bit of force to actually close the door. Perhaps something
    could be contrived with foam strip.

    Chris
     
    , Oct 7, 2007
    #4
  5. dg

    George Guest

    George, Oct 7, 2007
    #5
  6. dg

    Andy Hall Guest

    On 2007-10-07 13:24:31 +0100, dg <> said:

    > I need a solution to stop doors being slammed by teenage kids, which
    > in turn shakes the whole house.
    >
    > Mrs dg insists that it MUST be an ironmongery solution, and not
    > related physical or surgical treatment, or sending the kids off to a
    > care home.
    >
    > I've looked at the pneumatic kitchen cabinet closers, but these would
    > not seem to fit on a normal internal door, and not be strong enough in
    > any case.
    >
    > I've also looked at a dictator, but these seem obtrusive and need to
    > work with a door closer mechanism. I don't want any annoying self
    > closing doors
    >
    > The sponge things to prevent younger children from trapping their
    > fingers are no good, as we need the doors to close.
    >
    > Are there any anti-slam products available for lightweight internal
    > doors?
    >
    > dg


    I think that you need to work on Mrs dg.

    It seems to be a common issue - not sure whether it's carelessness,
    can't be bothered, f*ck you, pissing against lampposts or a combination.

    Unless you want to fit door closer mechanisms, which you say you don't,
    and I agree with you, I never found a hardware solution in terms of the
    actual doors being slammed.

    What did work, and is a hardware solution, was to take the door off of
    their bedrooms for a week or until the door banging stopped. Privacy
    is one of the most valued things to a teenager and it did seem to work
    better to address the issue rather than the symptom.
     
    Andy Hall, Oct 7, 2007
    #6
  7. dg

    Mary Fisher Guest

    "dg" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >I need a solution to stop doors being slammed by teenage kids, which
    > in turn shakes the whole house.
    >
    > Mrs dg insists that it MUST be an ironmongery solution, and not
    > related physical or surgical treatment, or sending the kids off to a
    > care home.
    >
    > I've looked at the pneumatic kitchen cabinet closers, but these would
    > not seem to fit on a normal internal door, and not be strong enough in
    > any case.
    >
    > I've also looked at a dictator, but these seem obtrusive and need to
    > work with a door closer mechanism. I don't want any annoying self
    > closing doors
    >
    > The sponge things to prevent younger children from trapping their
    > fingers are no good, as we need the doors to close.
    >
    > Are there any anti-slam products available for lightweight internal
    > doors?
    >
    > dg


    I've had the oppposite problem, getting children to close doors. In fact
    getting Spouse to close a door is difficult :-(

    It's a pity you can't use a surgical, or even capital, solution ...

    Mary
    >
     
    Mary Fisher, Oct 7, 2007
    #7
  8. dg

    Mary Fisher Guest

    "dennis@home" <-ass.net> wrote in message
    news:feapjl$4m0$...
    >

    ....

    > Try taking one of their favourite things off them if they keep doing it if
    > they want to behave like five year olds treat them like five year olds.
    > At worst they will threaten to leave.


    You call that 'worst'?

    Mary
    >
    >
     
    Mary Fisher, Oct 7, 2007
    #8
  9. dg

    kent Guest

    Does anyone know of any solution for smug contributors who either
    haven't had any teenage children or who have been blessed with less
    "spirited" offspring? Do they really think that all teenage behaviour
    is down to poor parenting?
     
    kent, Oct 7, 2007
    #9
  10. dg

    kent Guest

    On Oct 7, 6:00 pm, "dennis@home" <-ass.net>
    wrote:
    > "kent" <> wrote in message
    >
    > news:...
    >
    >
    >
    > > Does anyone know of any solution for smug contributors who either
    > > haven't had any teenage children or who have been blessed with less
    > > "spirited" offspring? Do they really think that all teenage behaviour
    > > is down to poor parenting?

    >
    > Do I detect someone with a chip?
    > AFAICS no-one has said any such thing, yet.


    Yes, you're right, I was a bit quick to jump! Teenagers can bring the
    worst out in you..................................... . I don't know
    where they get it from!!!
     
    kent, Oct 7, 2007
    #10
  11. dg

    ThePunisher Guest

    kent wrote:
    > Does anyone know of any solution for smug contributors who either
    > haven't had any teenage children or who have been blessed with less
    > "spirited" offspring? Do they really think that all teenage behaviour
    > is down to poor parenting?


    What do you think it down to then? hovering ufos?

    --
    ThePunisher
     
    ThePunisher, Oct 7, 2007
    #11
  12. dg

    kent Guest

    On Oct 7, 6:32 pm, "ThePunisher" <> wrote:
    > kent wrote:
    > > Does anyone know of any solution for smug contributors who either
    > > haven't had any teenage children or who have been blessed with less
    > > "spirited" offspring? Do they really think that all teenage behaviour
    > > is down to poor parenting?

    >
    > What do you think it down to then? hovering ufos?
    >
    > --
    > ThePunisher


    maybe genes, friendship difficulties, bullying, problems at school,
    wider family issues, bereavement, emotional difficulties of various
    kinds, frustrations of life, physical health issues, mental health
    issues, etc etc
     
    kent, Oct 7, 2007
    #12
  13. Andy Hall wrote:

    > What did work, and is a hardware solution, was to take the door off of
    > their bedrooms for a week or until the door banging stopped. Privacy
    > is one of the most valued things to a teenager and it did seem to work
    > better to address the issue rather than the symptom.


    Teenagers are examinng their ability to affect the world at large, and
    in whet way, and see how far that power extends.

    A solution that basically shows them that their power does NOT extend to
    replacing a door you have removed, is salutary, and basic. Go for it.

    A teenager is a child desperately trying to become an adult. If they
    behave like children, treat them like children.
     
    The Natural Philosopher, Oct 7, 2007
    #13
  14. kent wrote:
    >
    > Does anyone know of any solution for smug contributors who either
    > haven't had any teenage children or who have been blessed with less
    > "spirited" offspring? Do they really think that all teenage behaviour
    > is down to poor parenting?
    >

    No, but failure to attend to it in an appropriate manner is.


    In my day it would have been a "good sound thrashing", but times change.
    If te children are dependent on you - and they are, since they are at
    home, then stop dong something they depend on you for. Like running
    themn in te car tyo see their friends 'sorry: Too busy removing this
    door. You will have to walk'


    If they eat junk food, insteado of sitting down to food, stop buying it.
    Its amazing what a starving person will eat. And how quickly you can
    learn to cook when all thats in the fridge is raw vegetables and raw meat.

    If they slam doors, remove them. How will they explain THAT to hgeo
    friends 'Dad removed them because we kept slamming them'
    Yea, right.

    If they emabarrass you in public, embarass them right back.

    I have had kids in the supermarket queue stick out their tongues at me.
    Gurney them back. The last one that did that got so fucking scared he
    was still howling when his mother took him to the carpark. I banlked on
    te fact that the little bastard did NOT do it when his mother was
    looking. So she didn't see my response.. ;-)


    If kids go looking for a reaction, make good and sure they get one. Just
    don't make it the one they expect.

    Never fall into the 'its not fair' trap. Tell them life's not fair, so
    shut up.
     
    The Natural Philosopher, Oct 7, 2007
    #14
  15. Mary Fisher wrote:
    > "dg" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> I need a solution to stop doors being slammed by teenage kids, which
    >> in turn shakes the whole house.
    >>
    >> Mrs dg insists that it MUST be an ironmongery solution, and not
    >> related physical or surgical treatment, or sending the kids off to a
    >> care home.
    >>
    >> I've looked at the pneumatic kitchen cabinet closers, but these would
    >> not seem to fit on a normal internal door, and not be strong enough in
    >> any case.
    >>
    >> I've also looked at a dictator, but these seem obtrusive and need to
    >> work with a door closer mechanism. I don't want any annoying self
    >> closing doors
    >>
    >> The sponge things to prevent younger children from trapping their
    >> fingers are no good, as we need the doors to close.
    >>
    >> Are there any anti-slam products available for lightweight internal
    >> doors?
    >>
    >> dg

    >
    > I've had the oppposite problem, getting children to close doors. In fact
    > getting Spouse to close a door is difficult :-(
    >


    Indeed. I try to explain that in terms of wrecking the planet. 100
    lightbulbs left on = one door/window left open all evening with a
    thermostatically controlled CH zone.

    Of course then she come down in te morning and finds the REST of the
    house at tropical temperatures and opens all the OTHER windows as well.

    > It's a pity you can't use a surgical, or even capital, solution ...
    >

    Divorce. Its the only way.

    > Mary
    >
    >
     
    The Natural Philosopher, Oct 7, 2007
    #15
  16. dg

    kent Guest

    When a door is slammed it forces the air in front of it forwards. If
    the room is large then there is plenty of room for this air and the
    slam can be impressive (especially if the windows are open). However
    if the room is small and the windows are closed the air in the room
    acts as a cushion making door slamming vey difficult. So the solution
    is to live in a house with small rooms and to keep the windows closed!
     
    kent, Oct 7, 2007
    #16
  17. dg

    Andy Hall Guest

    On 2007-10-07 19:12:34 +0100, kent <> said:

    >
    >
    > When a door is slammed it forces the air in front of it forwards. If
    > the room is large then there is plenty of room for this air and the
    > slam can be impressive (especially if the windows are open). However
    > if the room is small and the windows are closed the air in the room
    > acts as a cushion making door slamming vey difficult. So the solution
    > is to live in a house with small rooms and to keep the windows closed!


    Yes but then you have increased territorial problems....
     
    Andy Hall, Oct 7, 2007
    #17
  18. dg

    Steve Firth Guest

    The Natural Philosopher <> wrote:

    > In my day it would have been a "good sound thrashing",


    Ah yes, violence, first reort of the stupid.

    > but times change. If te children are dependent on you - and they are,
    > since they are at home, then stop dong something they depend on you for.
    > Like running themn in te car tyo see their friends 'sorry: Too busy
    > removing this door. You will have to walk'


    Is there some sort of fear of treating children like people?
     
    Steve Firth, Oct 7, 2007
    #18
  19. dg

    John Guest

    "nightjar .me.uk>" <cpb@<insert my surname here> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > "dg" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >>I need a solution to stop doors being slammed by teenage kids, which
    >> in turn shakes the whole house.
    >>
    >> Mrs dg insists that it MUST be an ironmongery solution, and not
    >> related physical or surgical treatment, or sending the kids off to a
    >> care home.

    > ...
    >> I've also looked at a dictator, but these seem obtrusive and need to
    >> work with a door closer mechanism. I don't want any annoying self
    >> closing doors...

    >
    > There are door closers that also hold doors in the open position and only
    > self-close after the door has been moved away from the fully open
    > position. Look for an architectural ironmonger, who will be able to advise
    > you exactly what is available.
    >
    > Colin Bignell
    >


    What about fitting 3 or 4 cupboard soft closers - to share the additional
    load?

    Although I suppose a pushed door would tend to bounce off the buffers
     
    John, Oct 7, 2007
    #19
  20. dg

    Skipweasel Guest

    In article <>,
    says...
    > I need a solution to stop doors being slammed by teenage kids, which
    > in turn shakes the whole house.
    >


    Remove the doors. They soon learn that they'd rather have doors and some
    privacy but learn not to slam them than have no doors at all.

    --
    Skipweasel.
    Never knowingly understood.
     
    Skipweasel, Oct 7, 2007
    #20
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