240 volt rechargable power pack?

Discussion in 'UK DIY' started by Jac, Oct 20, 2003.

  1. Jac

    Jac Guest

    I need to find a rechargeable power pack to run power tools from,
    where no mains supply is available. Does anyone know who sells such a
    thing?

    Thanks

    Jack
     
    Jac, Oct 20, 2003
    #1
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  2. Jac

    Jac Guest

    On Mon, 20 Oct 2003 10:46:24 GMT, (Jac) wrote:

    PS.. It needs to be small and portable...
     
    Jac, Oct 20, 2003
    #2
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  3. Jac

    Grunff Guest

    Jac wrote:

    > On Mon, 20 Oct 2003 10:46:24 GMT, (Jac) wrote:
    >
    > PS.. It needs to be small and portable...


    They're called generators :)

    Seriously - if you need any amount of power (more than a couple
    of hundred Watts) for any period of time (more than 10 minutes),
    a generator is your only option.

    --
    Grunff
     
    Grunff, Oct 20, 2003
    #3
  4. Jac

    Jac Guest

    On Mon, 20 Oct 2003 12:12:49 +0100, Grunff <> wrote:

    >>Jac wrote:
    >>
    >>> On Mon, 20 Oct 2003 10:46:24 GMT, (Jac) wrote:
    >>>
    >>> PS.. It needs to be small and portable...

    >>
    >>They're called generators :)
    >>
    >>Seriously - if you need any amount of power (more than a couple
    >>of hundred Watts) for any period of time (more than 10 minutes),
    >>a generator is your only option.
    >>
    >>--
    >>Grunff


    Thanks for the reply. Actually, I only need to run 25 watts, and the
    power needs to last about 2 hours max... A generator would be
    unsuitable because of the location/working environment.

    So... still looking for a 240v rechargable power supply...

    Jac
     
    Jac, Oct 20, 2003
    #4
  5. Jac

    Grunff Guest

    Jac wrote:

    > Thanks for the reply. Actually, I only need to run 25 watts, and the
    > power needs to last about 2 hours max... A generator would be
    > unsuitable because of the location/working environment.
    >
    > So... still looking for a 240v rechargable power supply...


    That's very easy - 1x car battery, 1x 12V inverter.

    --
    Grunff
     
    Grunff, Oct 20, 2003
    #5
  6. Jac

    Dave Plowman Guest

    In article <>,
    Jac <> wrote:
    > PS.. It needs to be small and portable...


    You need an inverter to produce 230v AC from some form of battery. It
    depends on what tools you wish to power, but say an 800 watt one that
    would do most will cost somewhere around 100-150 quid. And run off a large
    car battery for maybe a couple of hours.

    So neither small, portable or cheap.

    I presume just buying re-chargeable tools is out for your needs?

    If you're using tools that can't be bought in re-chargeable versions, a
    portable generator is the way to go - petrol or diesel is a far better
    source of energy than any practical battery

    --
    *Can atheists get insurance for acts of God? *

    Dave Plowman London SW 12
    RIP Acorn
     
    Dave Plowman, Oct 20, 2003
    #6
  7. Jac

    Grunff Guest

    Grunff wrote:

    >> Thanks for the reply. Actually, I only need to run 25 watts, and the
    >> power needs to last about 2 hours max... A generator would be
    >> unsuitable because of the location/working environment.
    >>
    >> So... still looking for a 240v rechargable power supply...

    >
    >
    > That's very easy - 1x car battery, 1x 12V inverter.


    Like maplin.co.uk code N32AZ

    Out of interest, what 25W device do you need to run which is
    only available in a mains version?

    --
    Grunff
     
    Grunff, Oct 20, 2003
    #7
  8. Jac

    Dave Plowman Guest

    In article <>,
    Jac <> wrote:
    > Thanks for the reply. Actually, I only need to run 25 watts, and the
    > power needs to last about 2 hours max... A generator would be
    > unsuitable because of the location/working environment.



    What power tool only takes 25 watts?

    --
    *Never underestimate the power of stupid people in large groups.

    Dave Plowman London SW 12
    RIP Acorn
     
    Dave Plowman, Oct 20, 2003
    #8
  9. Jac

    Jac Guest

    On Mon, 20 Oct 2003 12:45:27 +0100, Grunff <> wrote:

    >>Grunff wrote:
    >>
    >>>> Thanks for the reply. Actually, I only need to run 25 watts, and the
    >>>> power needs to last about 2 hours max... A generator would be
    >>>> unsuitable because of the location/working environment.
    >>>>
    >>>> So... still looking for a 240v rechargable power supply...
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> That's very easy - 1x car battery, 1x 12V inverter.

    >>
    >>Like maplin.co.uk code N32AZ
    >>
    >>Out of interest, what 25W device do you need to run which is
    >>only available in a mains version?


    Actually a small 25w solid state guitar amplifier. (a "tool" of my
    trade)...

    Jac
     
    Jac, Oct 20, 2003
    #9
  10. Jac

    Huge Guest

    (Jac) writes:
    >On Mon, 20 Oct 2003 12:45:27 +0100, Grunff <> wrote:
    >
    >>>Grunff wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>> Thanks for the reply. Actually, I only need to run 25 watts, and the
    >>>>> power needs to last about 2 hours max... A generator would be
    >>>>> unsuitable because of the location/working environment.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> So... still looking for a 240v rechargable power supply...
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> That's very easy - 1x car battery, 1x 12V inverter.
    >>>
    >>>Like maplin.co.uk code N32AZ
    >>>
    >>>Out of interest, what 25W device do you need to run which is
    >>>only available in a mains version?

    >
    >Actually a small 25w solid state guitar amplifier. (a "tool" of my
    >trade)...


    Are you the bloke who busks in Canary Wharf Tube Station in the
    mornings?

    If so, can you learn some new tunes, please?

    --
    "The road to Paradise is through Intercourse."
    The uk.transport FAQ; http://www.huge.org.uk/transport/FAQ.html
    [email me at huge [at] huge [dot] org [dot] uk]
     
    Huge, Oct 20, 2003
    #10
  11. Jac

    Grunff Guest

    Jac wrote:

    > Actually a small 25w solid state guitar amplifier. (a "tool" of my
    > trade)...


    That is going to be running on a much lower voltage than mains,
    DC too - so it wouldn't make sense to carry around a 12V
    battery, step up the voltage to 240AC, feed it into the amp
    which then steps it back down to probably 12V, maybe as much as 24V.

    The most sensible thing to do is find out what voltage it runs
    at (if you're not confident opening it up and investigating,
    find someone who is) and use a car battery/two car batteries
    depending on the voltage.

    --
    Grunff
     
    Grunff, Oct 20, 2003
    #11
  12. Jac

    Jac Guest

    On Mon, 20 Oct 2003 15:57:07 +0100, Grunff <> wrote:

    >>Jac wrote:
    >>
    >>> Actually a small 25w solid state guitar amplifier. (a "tool" of my
    >>> trade)...

    >>
    >>That is going to be running on a much lower voltage than mains,
    >>DC too - so it wouldn't make sense to carry around a 12V
    >>battery, step up the voltage to 240AC, feed it into the amp
    >>which then steps it back down to probably 12V, maybe as much as 24V.
    >>
    >>The most sensible thing to do is find out what voltage it runs
    >>at (if you're not confident opening it up and investigating,
    >>find someone who is) and use a car battery/two car batteries
    >>depending on the voltage.


    Grunff,
    Thanks for the continued suggestions. It actually runs on 14volts
    after the mains transformer. I was initially trying to figure out how
    to add a rechargeable battery to the cirquit, but it's not as simple
    as it sounds because there is a split power supply: a positive one and
    a negative one, so it would require two batteries. Large echargeable
    batteries aren't cheap and I don't quite feel competent enough to mess
    around with the cirquit. But I guess I could possibly employ a tekkie
    to do thie job, if I can find one who knows what he's doing.

    So, still looking for ideas..

    Jac
     
    Jac, Oct 20, 2003
    #12
  13. Jac

    Jac Guest

    On 20 Oct 2003 14:56:33 GMT, (Huge) wrote:


    >>Are you the bloke who busks in Canary Wharf Tube Station in the
    >>mornings?
    >>
    >>If so, can you learn some new tunes, please?


    You are quite safe... The last time I did any busking was in 1979....
    :)

    Jac
     
    Jac, Oct 20, 2003
    #13
  14. Jac

    Tim Mitchell Guest

    In article <>, Grunff
    <> writes
    >Jac wrote:
    >
    >> Actually a small 25w solid state guitar amplifier. (a "tool" of my
    >> trade)...

    >
    >That is going to be running on a much lower voltage than mains, DC too
    >- so it wouldn't make sense to carry around a 12V battery, step up the
    >voltage to 240AC, feed it into the amp which then steps it back down to
    >probably 12V, maybe as much as 24V.
    >
    >The most sensible thing to do is find out what voltage it runs at (if
    >you're not confident opening it up and investigating, find someone who
    >is) and use a car battery/two car batteries depending on the voltage.
    >

    Any decent music shop with a repairs dept would be able to fit a battery
    input for you. It would probably run happily off a small burglar alarm
    type lead acid battery, never mind a car battery.
    --
    Tim Mitchell
     
    Tim Mitchell, Oct 20, 2003
    #14
  15. Jac

    Grunff Guest

    Jac wrote:

    > Thanks for the continued suggestions. It actually runs on 14volts
    > after the mains transformer. I was initially trying to figure out how
    > to add a rechargeable battery to the cirquit, but it's not as simple
    > as it sounds because there is a split power supply: a positive one and
    > a negative one, so it would require two batteries. Large echargeable
    > batteries aren't cheap and I don't quite feel competent enough to mess
    > around with the cirquit.


    If it runs on 14, it'll run on 12. You can either use a negative
    voltage generator, or much more simply, use two batteries.

    You say rechargeables are expensive - go to a motor factor (not
    Halfords!), and buy two of the smallest car batteries they have.
    Mini (as in Austin) batteries are great. Should be about £20 each.

    Make up a suitable box for carring them, and you're off. That
    provides you with your +/- 12V, and enough capacity to play all day.

    If that's too heavy (I don't know how far you intend to carry
    this), get a pair of 12V sealed lead acids - but you really need
    at least 10Ah for this to be useful.



    > But I guess I could possibly employ a tekkie
    > to do thie job, if I can find one who knows what he's doing.


    With a pair of batteries it's 3 wires, that's it. Much simpler
    than using a mains inverter.

    --
    Grunff
     
    Grunff, Oct 20, 2003
    #15
  16. Jac wrote:

    > On Mon, 20 Oct 2003 12:12:49 +0100, Grunff <> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>>Jac wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>On Mon, 20 Oct 2003 10:46:24 GMT, (Jac) wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>PS.. It needs to be small and portable...
    >>>>
    >>>They're called generators :)
    >>>
    >>>Seriously - if you need any amount of power (more than a couple
    >>>of hundred Watts) for any period of time (more than 10 minutes),
    >>>a generator is your only option.
    >>>
    >>>--
    >>>Grunff
    >>>

    >
    > Thanks for the reply. Actually, I only need to run 25 watts, and the
    > power needs to last about 2 hours max... A generator would be
    > unsuitable because of the location/working environment.
    >
    > So... still looking for a 240v rechargable power supply...



    Ac or DC? If AC use 12v car battery and battery charger, and a caravan
    invertpr.

    If DC, you had better build your own. 240V DC is damned nasty - will
    burn like hell if you grab it.


    >
    > Jac
    >
     
    The Natural Philosopher, Oct 20, 2003
    #16
  17. Jac wrote:

    > On Mon, 20 Oct 2003 12:45:27 +0100, Grunff <> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>>Grunff wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>>Thanks for the reply. Actually, I only need to run 25 watts, and the
    >>>>>power needs to last about 2 hours max... A generator would be
    >>>>>unsuitable because of the location/working environment.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>So... still looking for a 240v rechargable power supply...
    >>>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>That's very easy - 1x car battery, 1x 12V inverter.
    >>>>
    >>>Like maplin.co.uk code N32AZ
    >>>
    >>>Out of interest, what 25W device do you need to run which is
    >>>only available in a mains version?
    >>>

    >
    > Actually a small 25w solid state guitar amplifier. (a "tool" of my
    > trade)...
    >



    That's easy. Couple tow small 12v batteries in series to the big
    smoothing capacitor inside it, and forget the mains.

    It will be running on about 20-30V probably internally.


    It will also hum a lot less that way.



    > Jac
    >
    >
    >
     
    The Natural Philosopher, Oct 20, 2003
    #17
  18. Jac wrote:

    > On Mon, 20 Oct 2003 15:57:07 +0100, Grunff <> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>>Jac wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>Actually a small 25w solid state guitar amplifier. (a "tool" of my
    >>>>trade)...
    >>>>
    >>>That is going to be running on a much lower voltage than mains,
    >>>DC too - so it wouldn't make sense to carry around a 12V
    >>>battery, step up the voltage to 240AC, feed it into the amp
    >>>which then steps it back down to probably 12V, maybe as much as 24V.
    >>>
    >>>The most sensible thing to do is find out what voltage it runs
    >>>at (if you're not confident opening it up and investigating,
    >>>find someone who is) and use a car battery/two car batteries
    >>>depending on the voltage.
    >>>

    >
    > Grunff,
    > Thanks for the continued suggestions. It actually runs on 14volts
    > after the mains transformer. I was initially trying to figure out how
    > to add a rechargeable battery to the cirquit, but it's not as simple
    > as it sounds because there is a split power supply: a positive one and
    > a negative one, so it would require two batteries. Large echargeable
    > batteries aren't cheap and I don't quite feel competent enough to mess
    > around with the cirquit. But I guess I could possibly employ a tekkie
    > to do thie job, if I can find one who knows what he's doing.
    >



    +- 14v? and a split rail? That's easy - 2x12 cell Nicad pack.

    Not hard to modify either. Need to turn the original transformer into a
    trickle charge circuit (couple of resistors) , and replace the AC switch
    with a DC one, running off the cells.

    Trivial really. However the cells won't be cheap. Your best bet is to
    source 4x6 cell packs as used in model car racing, and use those - iften
    available on E-bay cheep, cos ebveryine wanst more powe than those toys
    come with, and upgrades.

    If you are in east anglia, I'll have a go modding it.



    > So, still looking for ideas..
    >
    > Jac
    >
     
    The Natural Philosopher, Oct 20, 2003
    #18
  19. Grunff wrote:

    > Jac wrote:
    >
    >> Thanks for the continued suggestions. It actually runs on 14volts
    >> after the mains transformer. I was initially trying to figure out how
    >> to add a rechargeable battery to the cirquit, but it's not as simple
    >> as it sounds because there is a split power supply: a positive one and
    >> a negative one, so it would require two batteries. Large echargeable
    >> batteries aren't cheap and I don't quite feel competent enough to mess
    >> around with the cirquit.

    >
    >
    > If it runs on 14, it'll run on 12. You can either use a negative voltage
    > generator, or much more simply, use two batteries.
    >
    > You say rechargeables are expensive - go to a motor factor (not
    > Halfords!), and buy two of the smallest car batteries they have. Mini
    > (as in Austin) batteries are great. Should be about £20 each.
    >
    > Make up a suitable box for carring them, and you're off. That provides
    > you with your +/- 12V, and enough capacity to play all day.
    >
    > If that's too heavy (I don't know how far you intend to carry this), get
    > a pair of 12V sealed lead acids - but you really need at least 10Ah for
    > this to be useful.
    >
    >
    >
    >> But I guess I could possibly employ a tekkie
    >> to do thie job, if I can find one who knows what he's doing.

    >
    >
    > With a pair of batteries it's 3 wires, that's it. Much simpler than
    > using a mains inverter.
    >


    24 SUB C Nicads 1700Ma/h would weigh 3lb roughly, and sit in the bottom
    of the case. Dead easy to source in backs of 6. at 25W - about 1-2A
    drain - gettng on for an hour of playing at least. More money would net
    you larger capacity cells too.
     
    The Natural Philosopher, Oct 20, 2003
    #19
  20. Jac

    Mr Fiendish Guest

    [lost the start of this thread - but somebody said in response to
    somebody else...]

    >Ac or DC? If AC use 12v car battery and battery charger, and a caravan
    >invertpr.


    Just noticed that TLC have an inverter on offer -- one for which the
    claim is made that it is suitable for videos so presumably the
    wavefrom isn't too bad ...

    See:
    http://www.tlc-direct.co.uk/Products/TLINV150.html

    150W - 20 pounds

    Don't all rush - I might have one myself.


    Barley Twist
    (Please put out the cats to reply direct)
     
    Mr Fiendish, Oct 20, 2003
    #20
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